Cancellations

UPDATED: 6/1/2020

Following the announcement of the state's confirmed cases of the COVID-19 and in an effort to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus an for the safety of our members the church board has decided to cancel the following:

- Mid-Week Service for Wednesday, June 3

- Youth Bible Study for Wednesday, June 3

- Prayer Meeting for Friday, June 5

- Sunday Services for Sunday, May 31 - In-Person @ 10AM
(PLEASE SEE THE BELOW VIDEO GUIDELINES)

Any update regarding services and practices for the week of JUNE 8 will be provided next week.


**MEN'S RETREAT POSTPONED UNTIL THE FALL**


**THE SZABO & MORHAN WEDDING HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO SATURDAY, JULY 18**

**THE LAPORTE & HERMAN WEDDING HAS BEEN RESCHEDULED TO SUNDAY, JULY 26**

MESSAGE FROM THE PASTOR:

COVID-19 Updates

Executive Order 2020-96 (COVID-19)

Temporary Requirement to Suspend Activities that are Not Necessary to Sustain or Protect Life

Rescission of Executive Order 2020-77
The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease that can result in serious illness or death. It is caused by a new strain of coronavirus not previously identified in humans and easily spread from person to person. There is currently no approved vaccine or antiviral treatment for this disease.

On March 10, 2020, the Department of Health and Human Services identified the first two presumptive-positive cases of COVID-19 in Michigan. On that same day, I issued Executive Order 2020-4. This order declared a state of emergency across the state of Michigan under section 1 of article 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, the Emergency Management Act, 1976 PA 390, as amended, MCL 30.401 et seq., and the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945, 1945 PA 302, as amended, MCL 10.31 et seq.

Since then, the virus spread across Michigan, bringing deaths in the thousands, confirmed cases in the tens of thousands, and deep disruption to this state’s economy, homes, and educational, civic, social, and religious institutions. On April 1, 2020, in response to the widespread and severe health, economic, and social harms posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, I issued Executive Order 2020-33. This order expanded on Executive Order 2020-4 and declared both a state of emergency and a state of disaster across the State of Michigan under section 1 of article 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, the Emergency Management Act, and the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945. And on April 30, 2020, finding that COVID-19 had created emergency and disaster conditions across the State of Michigan, I issued Executive Order 2020-67 to continue the emergency declaration under the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act, as well as Executive Order 2020-68 to issue new emergency and disaster declarations under the Emergency Management Act.

The Emergency Management Act vests the governor with broad powers and duties to “cop[e] with dangers to this state or the people of this state presented by a disaster or emergency,” which the governor may implement through “executive orders, proclamations, and directives having the force and effect of law.” MCL 30.403(1)-(2). Similarly, the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945 provides that, after declaring a state of emergency, “the governor may promulgate reasonable orders, rules, and regulations as he or she considers necessary to protect life and property or to bring the emergency situation within the affected area under control.” MCL 10.31(1).

To suppress the spread of COVID-19, to prevent the state’s health care system from being overwhelmed, to allow time for the production of critical test kits, ventilators, and personal protective equipment, to establish the public health infrastructure necessary to contain the spread of infection, and to avoid needless deaths, it is reasonable and necessary to direct residents to remain at home or in their place of residence to the maximum extent feasible. To that end, on March 23, 2020, I issued Executive Order 2020-21, ordering all people in Michigan to stay home and stay safe. In Executive Orders 2020-42, 2020-59, 2020-70, 2020-77, and 2020-92, I extended that initial order, modifying its scope as needed and appropriate to match the ever-changing circumstances presented by this pandemic.

The measures put in place by these executive orders have been effective: the number of new confirmed cases each day has started to drop. Although the virus remains aggressive and persistent—on May 20, 2020, Michigan reported 53,009 confirmed cases and 5,060 deaths—the strain on our health care system has begun to relent, even as our testing capacity has increased. We can now start the process of gradually resuming in-person work and activities that were temporarily suspended under my prior orders. In so doing, however, we must move with care, patience, and vigilance, recognizing the grave harm that this virus continues to inflict on our state and how quickly our progress in suppressing it can be undone.

With this order, I find it reasonable and necessary to reaffirm the measures set forth in Executive Order 2020-92, while also allowing gatherings of no more than ten people statewide, effective immediately, and permitting retailers and motor vehicle dealerships to see customers by appointment, beginning on May 26, 2020. In addition, because our health-care capacity has improved with respect to personal protective equipment, available beds, personnel, ventilators, and necessary supplies, I find it reasonable to rescind Executive Orders 2020-17 and 2020-34, which required health-care and veterinary facilities to implement plans to postpone some medical and dental procedures. Those rescissions will take effect on May 29.

Acting under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, I order the following:

This order must be construed broadly to prohibit in-person work that is not necessary to sustain or protect life.
For purposes of this order, Michigan comprises eight separate regions:
Region 1 includes the following counties: Monroe, Washtenaw, Livingston, Genesee, Lapeer, Saint Clair, Oakland, Macomb, and Wayne.
Region 2 includes the following counties: Mason, Lake, Osceola, Clare, Oceana, Newaygo, Mecosta, Isabella, Muskegon, Montcalm, Ottawa, Kent, and Ionia.
Region 3 includes the following counties: Allegan, Barry, Van Buren, Kalamazoo, Calhoun, Berrien, Cass, Saint Joseph, and Branch.
Region 4 includes the following counties: Oscoda, Alcona, Ogemaw, Iosco, Gladwin, Arenac, Midland, Bay, Saginaw, Tuscola, Sanilac, and Huron.
Region 5 includes the following counties: Gratiot, Clinton, Shiawassee, Eaton, and Ingham.
Region 6 includes the following counties: Manistee, Wexford, Missaukee, Roscommon, Benzie, Grand Traverse, Kalkaska, Crawford, Leelanau, Antrim, Otsego, Montmorency, Alpena, Charlevoix, Cheboygan, Presque Isle, and Emmet.
Region 7 includes the following counties: Hillsdale, Lenawee, and Jackson.
Region 8 includes the following counties: Gogebic, Ontonagon, Houghton, Keweenaw, Iron, Baraga, Dickinson, Marquette, Menominee, Delta, Alger, Schoolcraft, Luce, Mackinac, and Chippewa.
Subject to the exceptions in section 8 of this order, all individuals currently living within the State of Michigan are ordered to stay at home or at their place of residence. Subject to the same exceptions, all public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring among persons not part of a single household are prohibited.
All individuals who leave their home or place of residence must adhere to social distancing measures recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”), including remaining at least six feet from people from outside the individual’s household to the extent feasible under the circumstances.
No person or entity shall operate a business or conduct operations that require workers to leave their homes or places of residence except to the extent that those workers are necessary to sustain or protect life, to conduct minimum basic operations, or to perform a resumed activity within the meaning of this order.
For purposes of this order, workers who are necessary to sustain or protect life are defined as “critical infrastructure workers,” as described in sections 9 and 10 of this order.
For purposes of this order, workers who are necessary to conduct minimum basic operations are those whose in-person presence is strictly necessary to allow the business or operation to maintain the value of inventory and equipment, care for animals, ensure security, process transactions (including payroll and employee benefits), or facilitate the ability of other workers to work remotely.
Businesses and operations must determine which of their workers are necessary to conduct minimum basic operations and inform such workers of that designation. Businesses and operations must make such designations in writing, whether by electronic message, public website, or other appropriate means. Workers need not carry copies of their designations when they leave the home or place of residence for work.
Any in-person work necessary to conduct minimum basic operations must be performed consistently with the social distancing practices and other mitigation measures described in Executive Order 2020-97 and any orders that may follow from it.
Workers who perform resumed activities are defined in section 11 of this order.
Businesses and operations that employ critical infrastructure workers or workers who perform resumed activities may continue in-person operations, subject to the following conditions:
Consistent with sections 9, 10, and 11 of this order, businesses and operations must determine which of their workers are critical infrastructure workers or workers who perform resumed activities and inform such workers of that designation. Businesses and operations must make such designations in writing, whether by electronic message, public website, or other appropriate means. Workers need not carry copies of their designations when they leave the home or place of residence for work. Businesses and operations need not designate:
Workers in health care and public health.
Workers who perform necessary government activities, as described in section 7 of this order.
Workers and volunteers described in section 10(d) of this order.
In-person activities that are not necessary to sustain or protect life or to perform a resumed activity must be suspended.
Businesses and operations maintaining in-person activities must adopt social distancing practices and other mitigation measures to protect workers and patrons, as described in Executive Order 2020-97 and any orders that may follow from it.
Any business or operation that employs workers who perform resumed activities under section 11(a) of this order, but that does not sell necessary supplies, may sell any goods through remote sales via delivery or at the curbside. Such a business or operation, however, must otherwise remain closed to the public.
All in-person government activities at whatever level (state, county, or local) are suspended unless:
They are performed by critical infrastructure workers, including workers in law enforcement, public safety, and first responders, as defined in sections 9 and 10 of this order.
They are performed by workers who are permitted to resume work under section 11 of this order.
They are necessary to support the activities of workers described in sections 9, 10, and 11 of this order, or to enable transactions that support businesses or operations that employ such workers.
They involve public transit, trash pick-up and disposal (including recycling and composting), the management and oversight of elections, and the maintenance of safe and sanitary public parks so as to allow for outdoor activity permitted under this order.
For purposes of this order, necessary government activities include minimum basic operations, as described in 5(b) of this order. Workers performing such activities need not be designated.
Any in-person government activities must be performed consistently with the social distancing practices and other mitigation measures to protect workers and patrons described in Executive Order 2020-97 and any orders that may follow from it.
Exceptions.
Individuals may leave their home or place of residence, and travel as necessary:
To engage in outdoor recreational activity, consistent with remaining at least six feet from people from outside the individual’s household. Outdoor recreational activity includes walking, hiking, running, cycling, boating, golfing, or other similar activity, as well as any comparable activity for those with limited mobility.
To perform their jobs as critical infrastructure workers after being so designated by their employers. (Critical infrastructure workers who need not be designated under section 6(a) of this order may leave their home for work without being designated.)
To conduct minimum basic operations, as described in section 5(b) of this order, after being designated to perform such work by their employers.
To perform resumed activities, as described in section 11 of this order, after being designated to perform such work by their employers.
To perform necessary government activities, as described in section 7 of this order.
To perform tasks that are necessary to their health and safety, or to the health and safety of their family or household members (including pets). Individuals may, for example, leave the home or place of residence to secure medication or to seek medical or dental care for themselves or a household or family member.
To obtain necessary services or supplies for themselves, their family or household members, their pets, and their motor vehicles.
Individuals must secure such services or supplies via delivery to the maximum extent possible. As needed, however, individuals may leave the home or place of residence to purchase groceries, take-out food, gasoline, needed medical supplies, and any other products necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and basic operation of their residences or motor vehicles.
Individuals may also leave the home to pick up or return a motor vehicle as permitted under section 10(i) of this order, or to go to a motor vehicle dealership showroom by appointment, as permitted under section 11(p) of this order.
Individuals may leave the home to have a bicycle repaired or maintained.
Individuals should limit, to the maximum extent that is safe and feasible, the number of household members who leave the home for any errands.
To pick up non-necessary supplies at the curbside from a store that must otherwise remain closed to the public.
To care for a family member or a family member’s pet in another household.
To care for minors, dependents, the elderly, persons with disabilities, or other vulnerable persons.
To visit an individual under the care of a health care facility, residential care facility, or congregate care facility, to the extent otherwise permitted.
To visit a child in out-of-home care, or to facilitate a visit between a parent and a child in out-of-home care, when there is agreement between the child placing agency, the parent, and the caregiver about a safe visitation plan, or when, failing such agreement, the individual secures an exception from the executive director of the Children’s Services Agency.
To attend legal proceedings or hearings for essential or emergency purposes as ordered by a court.
To work or volunteer for businesses or operations (including both religious and secular nonprofit organizations) that provide food, shelter, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals, individuals who need assistance as a result of this emergency, and people with disabilities.
To attend a funeral, provided that no more than 10 people are in attendance.
To attend a meeting of an addiction recovery mutual aid society, provided that no more than 10 people are in attendance.
To view a real-estate listing by appointment, as permitted under section 11(g) of this order.
To participate in training, credentialing, or licensing activities permitted under section 11(i) of this order.
For individuals in Regions 6 or 8, to go to a restaurant or a retail store.
To go to a retail store by appointment, as permitted under section 11(q) of this order.
To attend a social gathering of no more than 10 people.
Individuals may also travel:
To return to a home or place of residence from outside this state.
To leave this state for a home or residence elsewhere.
Between two residences in this state, including moving to a new residence.
As required by law enforcement or a court order, including the transportation of children pursuant to a custody agreement.
All other travel is prohibited, including all travel to vacation rentals.
For purposes of this order, critical infrastructure workers are those workers described by the Director of the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency in his guidance of March 19, 2020 on the COVID-19 response (available here). This order does not adopt any subsequent guidance document released by this same agency.
Consistent with the March 19, 2020 guidance document, critical infrastructure workers include some workers in each of the following sectors:
Health care and public health.
Law enforcement, public safety, and first responders.
Food and agriculture.
Energy.
Water and wastewater.
Transportation and logistics.
Public works.
Communications and information technology, including news media.
Other community-based government operations and essential functions.
Critical manufacturing.
Hazardous materials.
Financial services.
Chemical supply chains and safety.
Defense industrial base.
For purposes of this order, critical infrastructure workers also include:
Child care workers (including workers at disaster relief child care centers), but only to the extent necessary to serve the children or dependents of critical infrastructure workers, workers who conduct minimum basic operations, workers who perform necessary government activities, or workers who perform resumed activities. This category includes individuals (whether licensed or not) who have arranged to care for the children or dependents of such workers.
Workers at suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers, as described below.
Any suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate another business’s or operation’s critical infrastructure work may designate their workers as critical infrastructure workers, provided that only those workers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate such work may be so designated.
Any suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the necessary work of suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers described in sub-provision (1) of this subsection may designate their workers as critical infrastructure workers provided that only those workers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate such work may be so designated.
Consistent with the scope of work permitted under sub-provision (2) of this subsection, any suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers further down the supply chain whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the necessary work of other suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers may likewise designate their workers as critical infrastructure workers, provided that only those workers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate such work may be so designated.
Suppliers, distribution centers, and service providers that abuse their designation authority under this subsection shall be subject to sanctions to the fullest extent of the law.
Workers in the insurance industry, but only to the extent that their work cannot be done by telephone or remotely.
Workers and volunteers for businesses or operations (including both religious and secular nonprofit organizations) that provide food, shelter, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals, individuals who need assistance as a result of this emergency, and people with disabilities.
Workers who perform critical labor union functions, including those who administer health and welfare funds and those who monitor the well-being and safety of union members who are critical infrastructure workers, provided that any administration or monitoring should be done by telephone or remotely where possible.
Workers at retail stores who sell groceries, medical supplies, and products necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and basic operation of residences or motor vehicles, including convenience stores, pet supply stores, auto supplies and repair stores, hardware and home maintenance stores, and home appliance retailers.
Workers at laundromats, coin laundries, and dry cleaners.
Workers at hotels and motels, provided that the hotels or motels do not offer additional in-house amenities such as gyms, pools, spas, dining, entertainment facilities, meeting rooms, or like facilities.
Workers at motor vehicle dealerships who are necessary to facilitate remote and electronic sales or leases, or to deliver motor vehicles to customers, provided that showrooms remain closed to in-person traffic until May 26, 2020 at 12:01 am.
For purposes of this order, workers who perform resumed activities are defined as follows:
Workers who process or fulfill remote orders for goods for delivery or curbside pick-up.
Workers who perform bicycle maintenance or repair.
Workers for garden stores, nurseries, and lawn care, pest control, and landscaping operations.
Workers for moving or storage operations.
Workers who perform work that is traditionally and primarily performed outdoors, including but not limited to forestry workers, outdoor power equipment technicians, parking enforcement workers, and outdoor workers at places of outdoor recreation not otherwise closed under Executive Order 2020-69 or any order that may follow from it.
Workers in the construction industry, including workers in the building trades (plumbers, electricians, HVAC technicians, and similar workers).
Workers in the real-estate industry, including agents, appraisers, brokers, inspectors, surveyors, and registers of deeds, provided that:
Any showings, inspections, appraisals, photography or videography, or final walk-throughs must be performed by appointment and must be limited to no more than four people on the premises at any one time. No in-person open houses are permitted.
Private showings may only be arranged for owner-occupied homes, vacant homes, vacant land, commercial property, and industrial property.
Workers necessary to the manufacture of goods that support workplace modification to forestall the spread of COVID-19 infections.
Workers necessary to train, credential, and license first responders (e.g., police officers, fire fighters, paramedics) and health-care workers, including certified nursing assistants, provided that as much instruction as possible is provided remotely.
Workers necessary to perform manufacturing activities. Manufacturing work may not commence under this subsection until the facility at which the work will be performed has been prepared to follow the workplace safeguards described in section 4 of Executive Order 2020-97 and any orders that may follow from it.
Workers necessary to conduct research activities in a laboratory setting.
For Regions 6 and 8, beginning at 12:01 am on May 22, 2020, workers necessary to perform retail activities. For purposes of this order, retail activities are defined:
As the selling of goods and the rendering of services incidental to the sale of the goods (e.g., any packaging and processing to allow for or facilitate the sale and delivery of the goods).
To exclude those places of public accommodation that are closed under Executive Order 2020-69 and any orders that may follow from it.
For Regions 6 and 8, beginning at 12:01 am on May 22, 2020, workers who work in an office setting, but only to the extent that such work is not capable of being performed remotely.
For Regions 6 and 8, beginning at 12:01 am on May 22, 2020, workers in restaurants or bars, subject to the capacity constraints and workplace standards described in Executive Order 2020-97. Nothing in this subsection should be taken to abridge or otherwise modify the existing power of a local government to impose further restrictions on restaurants or bars. For restaurants and bars subject to this subsection, this subsection supersedes the limitations placed on those restaurants and bars by Executive Order 2020-69 and any order that may follow from it.
Workers necessary to prepare a workplace to follow the workplace standards described in Executive Order 2020-97 and to otherwise ready the workplace for reopening.
Beginning at 12:01 am on May 26, 2020, workers at motor vehicle dealerships, provided that showrooms are open only by appointment.
Beginning at 12:01 am on May 26, 2020, workers necessary to perform retail activities by appointment, provided that the store is limited to 10 customers at any one time. For purposes of this order, retail activities are defined:
As the selling of goods and the rendering of services incidental to the sale of the goods (e.g., any packaging and processing to allow for or facilitate the sale and delivery of the goods).
To exclude those places of public accommodation that are closed under Executive Order 2020-69 and any orders that may follow from it.
Consistent with section 10(b) of this order, workers at suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate another business’s or operation’s resumed activities, including workers at suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers along the supply chain whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the necessary work of another supplier, distribution center, or service provider in enabling, supporting, or facilitating another business’s or operation’s resumed activities. Suppliers, distribution centers, and service providers that abuse their designation authority under this subsection shall be subject to sanctions to the fullest extent of the law.
Any store that is open for in-store sales under section 10(f), section 11(c), or section 11(q) of this executive order:
May continue to sell goods other than necessary supplies if the sale of such goods is in the ordinary course of business.
Must consider establishing curbside pick-up to reduce in-store traffic and mitigate outdoor lines.
No one shall rent a short-term vacation property except as necessary to assist in housing a health care professional aiding in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic or a volunteer who is aiding the same.
Michigan state parks remain open for day use, subject to any reductions in services and specific closures that, in the judgment of the director of the Department of Natural Resources, are necessary to minimize large gatherings and to prevent the spread of COVID-19.
Rules governing face coverings.
Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, any individual able to medically tolerate a face covering must wear a covering over his or her nose and mouth—such as a homemade mask, scarf, bandana, or handkerchief—when in any enclosed public space.
An individual may be required to temporarily remove a face covering upon entering an enclosed public space for identification purposes. An individual may also remove a face covering while seated at a restaurant or bar.
All businesses and operations whose workers perform in-person work must, at a minimum, provide non-medical grade face coverings to their workers.
Supplies of N95 masks and surgical masks should generally be reserved, for now, for health care professionals, first responders (e.g., police officers, fire fighters, paramedics), and other critical workers who interact with the public.
The protections against discrimination in the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act, 1976 PA 453, as amended, MCL 37.2101 et seq., and any other protections against discrimination in Michigan law, apply in full force to individuals who wear a face covering under this order.
Except as otherwise expressly stated in this order, nothing in this order should be taken to supersede another executive order or directive that is in effect, except to the extent this order imposes more stringent limitations on in-person work, activities, and interactions. Consistent with prior guidance, neither a place of religious worship nor its owner is subject to penalty under section 22 of this order for allowing religious worship at such place. No individual is subject to penalty under section 22 of this order for engaging in or traveling to engage in religious worship at a place of religious worship, or for violating section 15(a) of this order.
Nothing in this order should be taken to interfere with or infringe on the powers of the legislative and judicial branches to perform their constitutional duties or exercise their authority. Similarly, nothing in this order shall be taken to abridge protections guaranteed by the state or federal constitution under these emergency circumstances.
This order takes effect immediately, unless otherwise specified in this order, and continues through May 28, 2020 at 11:59 pm.
Executive Order 2020-17, which imposed temporary requirements regarding the postponement of non-essential medical and dental procedures, is rescinded as of May 28, 2020 at 11:59 pm. Executive Order 2020-34, which imposed temporary requirements regarding the postponement of veterinary services, is rescinded as of May 28, 2020 at 11:59 pm. Outpatient health-care facilities, including veterinary offices, are subject to the workplace safety rules described in Executive Order 2020-97.
Executive Orders 2020-92 is rescinded. All references to that order in other executive orders, agency rules, letters of understanding, or other legal authorities shall be taken to refer to this order.
I will evaluate the continuing need for this order prior to its expiration. In determining whether to maintain, intensify, or relax its restrictions, I will consider, among other things, (1) data on COVID-19 infections and the disease’s rate of spread; (2) whether sufficient medical personnel, hospital beds, and ventilators exist to meet anticipated medical need; (3) the availability of personal protective equipment for the health care workforce; (4) the state’s capacity to test for COVID-19 cases and isolate infected people; and (5) economic conditions in the state.
Consistent with MCL 10.33 and MCL 30.405(3), a willful violation of this order is a misdemeanor.
Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State of Michigan.

Executive Order 2020-77 (COVID-19) - RESCINDED

Temporary Requirement to Suspend Activities that are Not Necessary to Sustain or Protect Life

Rescission of Executive Order 2020-70

 
The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease that can result in serious illness or death. It is caused by a new strain of coronavirus not previously identified in humans and easily spread from person to person. There is currently no approved vaccine or antiviral treatment for this disease.
 
On March 10, 2020, the Department of Health and Human Services identified the first two presumptive-positive cases of COVID-19 in Michigan. On that same day, I issued Executive Order 2020-4. This order declared a state of emergency across the state of Michigan under section 1 of article 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, the Emergency Management Act, 1976 PA 390, as amended, MCL 30.401 et seq., and the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945, 1945 PA 302, as amended, MCL 10.31 et seq.
 
Since then, the virus spread across Michigan, bringing deaths in the thousands, confirmed cases in the tens of thousands, and deep disruption to this state’s economy, homes, and educational, civic, social, and religious institutions. On April 1, 2020, in response to the widespread and severe health, economic, and social harms posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, I issued Executive Order 2020-33. This order expanded on Executive Order 2020-4 and declared both a state of emergency and a state of disaster across the State of Michigan under section 1 of article 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, the Emergency Management Act, and the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945. And on April 30, 2020, finding that COVID-19 had created emergency and disaster conditions across the State of Michigan, I issued Executive Order 2020-67 to continue the emergency declaration under the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act, as well as Executive Order 2020-68 to issue new emergency and disaster declarations under the Emergency Management Act.
 
The Emergency Management Act vests the governor with broad powers and duties to “cop[e] with dangers to this state or the people of this state presented by a disaster or emergency,” which the governor may implement through “executive orders, proclamations,
and directives having the force and effect of law.” MCL 30.403(1)-(2). Similarly, the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945 provides that, after declaring a state of emergency, “the governor may promulgate reasonable orders, rules, and regulations as he or she considers necessary to protect life and property or to bring the emergency situation within the affected area under control.” MCL 10.31(1).
 
To suppress the spread of COVID-19, to prevent the state’s health care system from being overwhelmed, to allow time for the production of critical test kits, ventilators, and personal protective equipment, to establish the public health infrastructure necessary to contain the spread of infection, and to avoid needless deaths, it is reasonable and necessary to direct residents to remain at home or in their place of residence to the maximum extent feasible. To that end, on March 23, 2020, I issued Executive Order 2020-21, ordering all people in Michigan to stay home and stay safe. In Executive Orders 2020-42, 2020-59, and 2020-70, I extended that initial order, modifying its scope as needed and appropriate to match the ever-changing circumstances presented by this pandemic.
 
The measures put in place by Executive Orders 2020-21, 2020-42, 2020-59, and 2020-70 have been effective: the number of new confirmed cases each day has started to drop. Although the virus remains aggressive and persistent—on May 6, 2020, Michigan reported 45,054 confirmed cases and 4,250 deaths—the strain on our health care system has begun to relent, even as our testing capacity has increased. We can now start the process of gradually resuming in-person work and activities that were temporarily suspended under my prior orders. In so doing, however, we must move with care, patience, and vigilance, recognizing the grave harm that this virus continues to inflict on our state and how quickly our progress in suppressing it can be undone.
 
Accordingly, with this order, I find it reasonable and necessary to reaffirm the measures set forth in Executive Order 2020-70 and amend their scope. With Executive Order 2020-70, I ordered that certain previously suspended work and activities could resume, based on an evaluation of public health metrics and an assessment of the statewide risks and benefits. That evaluation remains ongoing, and based upon it, I find that we will soon be positioned to allow another segment of previously suspended work to resume: manufacturing work. This work, like the resumed activities allowed under Executive Order 2020-70, will be subject to stringent precautionary measures. This partial and incremental reopening will allow my public health team to evaluate the effects of allowing these activities to resume, to assess the capacity of the health care system to respond adequately to any increases in infections, and to prepare for any increase in patients presenting to a health-care facility or provider. With this order, Executive Order 2020-70 is rescinded. This order will remain in effect until May 28, 2020.
 
 
Acting under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, I order the following:
 
  1. This order must be construed broadly to prohibit in-person work that is not necessary to sustain or protect life.
 
  1. Subject to the exceptions in section 7 of this order, all individuals currently living within the State of Michigan are ordered to stay at home or at their place of residence. Subject to the same exceptions, all public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring among persons not part of a single household are prohibited.
 
  1. All individuals who leave their home or place of residence must adhere to social distancing measures recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”), including remaining at least six feet from people from outside the individual’s household to the extent feasible under the circumstances.
 
  1. No person or entity shall operate a business or conduct operations that require workers to leave their homes or places of residence except to the extent that those workers are necessary to sustain or protect life, to conduct minimum basic operations, or to perform a resumed activity within the meaning of this order.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, workers who are necessary to sustain or protect life are defined as “critical infrastructure workers,” as described in sections 8 and 9 of this order.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, workers who are necessary to conduct minimum basic operations are those whose in-person presence is strictly necessary to allow the business or operation to maintain the value of inventory and equipment, care for animals, ensure security, process transactions (including payroll and employee benefits), or facilitate the ability of other workers to work remotely.
 
Businesses and operations must determine which of their workers are necessary to conduct minimum basic operations and inform such workers of that designation. Businesses and operations must make such designations in writing, whether by electronic message, public website, or other appropriate means. Workers need not carry copies of their designations when they leave the home or place of residence for work.
 
Any in-person work necessary to conduct minimum basic operations must be performed consistently with the social distancing practices and other mitigation measures described in section 11 of this order.
 
  1. Workers who perform resumed activities are defined in section 10 of this order.
 
  1. Businesses and operations that employ critical infrastructure workers or workers who perform resumed activities may continue in-person operations, subject to the following conditions:
 
  1. Consistent with sections 8, 9, and 10 of this order, businesses and operations must determine which of their workers are critical infrastructure workers or workers who perform resumed activities and inform such workers of that designation. Businesses and operations must make such designations in writing, whether by electronic message, public website, or other appropriate means. Workers need not carry copies of their designations when they leave the home or place of residence for work. Businesses and operations need not designate:
 
  1. Workers in health care and public health.
 
  1. Workers who perform necessary government activities, as described in section 6 of this order.
 
  1. Workers and volunteers described in section 9(d) of this order.
 
  1. In-person activities that are not necessary to sustain or protect life or to perform a resumed activity must be suspended.
 
  1. Businesses and operations maintaining in-person activities must adopt social distancing practices and other mitigation measures to protect workers and patrons, as described in section 11 of this order. Stores that are open for in-person sales must also adhere to the rules described in section 12 of this order.
 
  1. Any business or operation that employs workers who perform resumed activities under section 10(a) of this order, but that does not sell necessary supplies, may sell any goods through remote sales via delivery or at the curbside. Such a business or operation, however, must otherwise remain closed to the public.
 
  1. All in-person government activities at whatever level (state, county, or local) are suspended unless:
 
  1. They are performed by critical infrastructure workers, including workers in law enforcement, public safety, and first responders, as defined in sections 8 and 9 of this order.
 
  1. They are performed by workers who are permitted to resume work under section 10 of this order.
 
  1. They are necessary to support the activities of workers described in sections 8, 9, and 10 of this order, or to enable transactions that support businesses or operations that employ such workers.
 
  1. They involve public transit, trash pick-up and disposal (including recycling and composting), the management and oversight of elections, and the maintenance of safe and sanitary public parks so as to allow for outdoor activity permitted under this order.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, necessary government activities include minimum basic operations, as described in section 4(b) of this order. Workers performing such activities need not be designated.
 
  1. Any in-person government activities must be performed consistently with the social distancing practices and other mitigation measures to protect workers and patrons described in section 11 of this order.
 
  1. Exceptions.
    1. Individuals may leave their home or place of residence, and travel as necessary:
      1. To engage in outdoor recreational activity, consistent with remaining at least six feet from people from outside the individual’s household. Outdoor recreational activity includes walking, hiking, running, cycling, boating, golfing, or other similar activity, as well as any comparable activity for those with limited mobility.
 
  1. To perform their jobs as critical infrastructure workers after being so designated by their employers. (Critical infrastructure workers who need not be designated under section 5(a) of this order may leave their home for work without being designated.)
 
  1. To conduct minimum basic operations, as described in section 4(b) of this order, after being designated to perform such work by their employers.
 
  1. To perform resumed activities, as described in section 10 of this order, after being designated to perform such work by their employers.
 
  1. To perform necessary government activities, as described in section 6 of this order.
 
  1. To perform tasks that are necessary to their health and safety, or to the health and safety of their family or household members (including pets). Individuals may, for example, leave the home or place of residence to secure medication or to seek medical or dental care that is necessary to address a medical emergency or to preserve the health and safety of a household or family member (including in-person procedures or veterinary services that, in accordance with a duly implemented non-essential procedure or veterinary services postponement plan, have not been postponed).
 
  1. To obtain necessary services or supplies for themselves, their family or household members, their pets, and their motor vehicles.
 
  1. Individuals must secure such services or supplies via delivery to the maximum extent possible. As needed, however, individuals may leave the home or place of residence to purchase groceries, take-out food, gasoline, needed medical supplies, and any other products necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and basic operation of their residences or motor vehicles.
 
  1. Individuals may also leave the home to pick up or return a motor vehicle as permitted under section 9(i) of this order, or to have a motor vehicle or bicycle repaired or maintained.
 
  1. Individuals should limit, to the maximum extent that is safe and feasible, the number of household members who leave the home for any errands.
 
  1. To pick up non-necessary supplies at the curbside from a store that must otherwise remain closed to the public.
 
  1. To care for a family member or a family member’s pet in another household.
 
  1. To care for minors, dependents, the elderly, persons with disabilities, or other vulnerable persons.
 
  1. To visit an individual under the care of a health care facility, residential care facility, or congregate care facility, to the extent otherwise permitted.
 
  1. To visit a child in out-of-home care, or to facilitate a visit between a parent and a child in out-of-home care, when there is agreement between the child placing agency, the parent, and the caregiver about a safe visitation plan, or when, failing such agreement, the individual secures an exception from the executive director of the Children’s Services Agency.
 
  1. To attend legal proceedings or hearings for essential or emergency purposes as ordered by a court.
 
  1. To work or volunteer for businesses or operations (including both religious and secular nonprofit organizations) that provide food, shelter, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals, individuals who need assistance as a result of this emergency, and people with disabilities.
 
  1. To attend a funeral, provided that no more than 10 people are in attendance.
 
  1. To attend a meeting of an addiction recovery mutual aid society, provided that no more than 10 people are in attendance.
 
  1. To view a real-estate listing by appointment, as permitted under section 10(g) of this order.
 
  1. To participate in training, credentialing, or licensing activities permitted under section 10(i) of this order.
 
  1. Individuals may also travel:
    1. To return to a home or place of residence from outside this state.
       
    2. To leave this state for a home or residence elsewhere.
 
  1. Between two residences in this state, including moving to a new residence.
 
  1. As required by law enforcement or a court order, including the transportation of children pursuant to a custody agreement.
 
  1. All other travel is prohibited, including all travel to vacation rentals.
     
  2. For purposes of this order, critical infrastructure workers are those workers described by the Director of the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency in his guidance of March 19, 2020 on the COVID-19 response (available here). This order does not adopt any subsequent guidance document released by this same agency.
 
Consistent with the March 19, 2020 guidance document, critical infrastructure workers include some workers in each of the following sectors:
 
  1. Health care and public health.
 
  1. Law enforcement, public safety, and first responders.
 
  1. Food and agriculture.
 
  1. Energy.
 
  1. Water and wastewater.
 
  1. Transportation and logistics.
 
  1. Public works.
 
  1. Communications and information technology, including news media.
 
  1. Other community-based government operations and essential functions.
 
  1. Critical manufacturing.
 
  1. Hazardous materials.
 
  • Financial services.
 
  1. Chemical supply chains and safety.
 
  • Defense industrial base.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, critical infrastructure workers also include:
 
  1. Child care workers (including workers at disaster relief child care centers), but only to the extent necessary to serve the children or dependents of critical infrastructure workers, workers who conduct minimum basic operations, workers who perform necessary government activities, or workers who perform resumed activities. This category includes individuals (whether licensed or not) who have arranged to care for the children or dependents of such workers.
 
  1. Workers at suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers, as described below.
 
  1. Any suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate another business’s or operation’s critical infrastructure work may designate their workers as critical infrastructure workers, provided that only those workers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate such work may be so designated.
 
  1. Any suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the necessary work of suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers described in subprovision (1) of this subsection may designate their workers as critical infrastructure workers provided that only those workers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate such work may be so designated.
 
  1. Consistent with the scope of work permitted under subprovision (2) of this subsection, any suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers further down the supply chain whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the necessary work of other suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers may likewise designate their workers as critical infrastructure workers, provided that only those workers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate such work may be so designated.
 
  1. Suppliers, distribution centers, and service providers that abuse their designation authority under this subsection shall be subject to sanctions to the fullest extent of the law.
 
  1. Workers in the insurance industry, but only to the extent that their work cannot be done by telephone or remotely.
 
  1. Workers and volunteers for businesses or operations (including both religious and secular nonprofit organizations) that provide food, shelter, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals, individuals who need assistance as a result of this emergency, and people with disabilities.
 
  1. Workers who perform critical labor union functions, including those who administer health and welfare funds and those who monitor the well-being and safety of union members who are critical infrastructure workers, provided that any administration or monitoring should be done by telephone or remotely where possible.
 
  1. Workers at retail stores who sell groceries, medical supplies, and products necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and basic operation of residences or motor vehicles, including convenience stores, pet supply stores, auto supplies and repair stores, hardware and home maintenance stores, and home appliance retailers.
 
  1. Workers at laundromats, coin laundries, and dry cleaners.
 
  1. Workers at hotels and motels, provided that the hotels or motels do not offer additional in-house amenities such as gyms, pools, spas, dining, entertainment facilities, meeting rooms, or like facilities.
 
  1. Workers at motor vehicle dealerships who are necessary to facilitate remote and electronic sales or leases, or to deliver motor vehicles to customers, provided that showrooms remain closed to in-person traffic.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, workers who perform resumed activities are defined as follows:
 
  1. Workers who process or fulfill remote orders for goods for delivery or curbside pick-up.
 
  1. Workers who perform bicycle maintenance or repair.
 
  1. Workers for garden stores, nurseries, and lawn care, pest control, and landscaping operations, subject to the enhanced social-distancing rules described in section 11(i) of this order.
 
  1. Workers for moving or storage operations, subject to the enhanced social-distancing rules described in section 11(i) of this order.
 
  1. Subject to the enhanced social-distancing rules described in section 11(i) of this order, workers who perform work that is traditionally and primarily performed outdoors, including but not limited to forestry workers, outdoor power equipment technicians, parking enforcement workers, and outdoor workers at places of outdoor recreation not otherwise closed under Executive Order 2020-69 or any order that may follow from it.
 
  1. Workers in the construction industry, including workers in the building trades (plumbers, electricians, HVAC technicians, and similar workers), subject to the workplace safeguards described in section 11(j) of this order.
 
  1. Workers in the real-estate industry, including agents, appraisers, brokers, inspectors, surveyors, and registers of deeds, provided that:
 
  1. Any showings, inspections, appraisals, photography or videography, or final walk-throughs must be performed by appointment and must be limited to no more than four people on the premises at any one time. No in-person open houses are permitted.
 
  1. Private showings may only be arranged for owner-occupied homes, vacant homes, vacant land, commercial property, and industrial property.
 
  1. Workers necessary to the manufacture of goods that support workplace modification to forestall the spread of COVID-19 infections.
 
  1. Workers necessary to train, credential, and license first responders (e.g., police officers, fire fighters, paramedics) and health-care workers, including certified nursing assistants, provided that as much instruction as possible is provided remotely.
 
  1. Workers necessary to perform start-up activities at manufacturing facilities, including activities necessary to prepare the facilities to follow the workplace safeguards described in section 11(k) of this order.
 
  1. Effective at 12:01 am on May 11, 2020, workers necessary to perform manufacturing activities, subject to the workplace safeguards described in section 11(k) of this order. Manufacturing work may not commence under this subsection until the facility at which the work will be performed has been prepared to follow the workplace safeguards described in section 11(k) of this order.
 
  • Consistent with section 9(b) of this order, workers at suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate another business’s or operation’s resumed activities, including workers at suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers along the supply chain whose in-person presence is necessary enable, support, or facilitate the necessary work of another supplier, distribution center, or service provider in enabling, supporting, or facilitating another business’s or operation’s resumed activities. Suppliers, distribution centers, and service providers that abuse their designation authority under this subsection shall be subject to sanctions to the fullest extent of the law.
 
 
  1. Businesses, operations, and government agencies that remain open for in-person work must, at a minimum:
 
  1. Develop a COVID-19 preparedness and response plan, consistent with recommendations in Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19, developed by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration and available here. Such plan must be available at company headquarters or the worksite.
 
  1. Restrict the number of workers present on premises to no more than is strictly necessary to perform the in-person work permitted under this order.
 
  1. Promote remote work to the fullest extent possible.
 
  1. Keep workers and patrons who are on premises at least six feet from one another to the maximum extent possible.
 
  1. Require masks to be worn when workers cannot consistently maintain six feet of separation from other individuals in the workplace, and consider face shields when workers cannot consistently maintain three feet of separation from other individuals in the workplace.
 
  1. Increase standards of facility cleaning and disinfection to limit worker and patron exposure to COVID-19, as well as adopting protocols to clean and disinfect in the event of a positive COVID-19 case in the workplace.
 
  1. Adopt policies to prevent workers from entering the premises if they display respiratory symptoms or have had contact with a person with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19.
 
  1. Adopt any other social distancing practices and mitigation measures recommended by the CDC.
 
  1. Businesses or operations whose in-person work is permitted under sections 10(c) through 10(e) of this order must also:
 
  1. Prohibit gatherings of any size in which people cannot maintain six feet of distance from one another.
 
  1. Limit in-person interaction with clients and patrons to the maximum extent possible, and bar any such interaction in which people cannot maintain six feet of distance from one another.
 
  1. Provide personal protective equipment such as gloves, goggles, face shields, and face masks as appropriate for the activity being performed.
 
  1. Adopt protocols to limit the sharing of tools and equipment to the maximum extent possible and to ensure frequent and thorough cleaning and disinfection of tools, equipment, and frequently touched surfaces.
 
  1. Businesses or operations in the construction industry must also:
 
  1. Adhere to all of the provisions in subsection (i) of this section.
 
  1. Designate a site-specific supervisor to monitor and oversee the implementation of COVID-19 control strategies developed under subsection (a) of this section. The supervisor must remain on-site at all times during activities. An on-site worker may be designated to perform the supervisory role.
 
  1. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for workers, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering a worksite, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with, if possible, a temperature screening.
 
  1. Create dedicated entry point(s) at every worksite, if possible, for daily screening as provided in subprovision (3) of this subsection, or in the alternative issue stickers or other indicators to workers to show that they received a screening before entering the worksite that day.
 
  1. Provide instructions for the distribution of personal protective equipment and designate on-site locations for soiled masks.
 
  1. Encourage or require the use of work gloves, as appropriate, to prevent skin contact with contaminated surfaces.
 
  1. Identify choke points and high-risk areas where workers must stand near one another (such as hallways, hoists and elevators, break areas, water stations, and buses) and control their access and use (including through physical barriers) so that social distancing is maintained.
 
  1. Ensure there are sufficient hand-washing or hand-sanitizing stations at the worksite to enable easy access by workers.
 
  1. Notify contractors (if a subcontractor) or owners (if a contractor) of any confirmed COVID-19 cases among workers at the worksite.
 
  1. Restrict unnecessary movement between project sites.
 
  1. Create protocols for minimizing personal contact upon delivery of materials to the worksite.
 
 
  1. Manufacturing facilities must also:
 
  1. Conduct a daily entry screening protocol for workers, contractors, suppliers, and any other individuals entering the facility, including a questionnaire covering symptoms and suspected or confirmed exposure to people with possible COVID-19, together with temperature screening as soon as no-touch thermometers can be obtained.
 
  1. Create dedicated entry point(s) at every facility for daily screening as provided in subprovision (1) of this subsection, and ensure physical barriers are in place to prevent anyone from bypassing the screening.
 
  1. Suspend all non-essential in-person visits, including tours.
 
  1. Train workers on, at a minimum:
 
  1. Routes by which the virus causing COVID-19 is transmitted from person to person.
 
  1. Distance that the virus can travel in the air, as well as the time it remains viable in the air and on environmental surfaces.
 
  1. Symptoms of COVID-19.
 
  1. Steps the worker must take to notify the business or operation of any symptoms of COVID-19 or a suspected or confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19.
 
  1. Measures that the facility is taking to prevent worker exposure to the virus, as described in the COVID-19 preparedness and response plan required under section 11(a) of this order.
 
  1. Rules that the worker must follow in order to prevent exposure to and spread of the virus.
 
  1. The use of personal protective equipment, including the proper steps for putting it on and taking it off.
 
  1. Reduce congestion in common spaces wherever practicable by, for example, closing salad bars and buffets within cafeterias and kitchens, requiring individuals to sit at least six feet from one another, placing markings on the floor to allow social distancing while standing in line, offering boxed food via delivery or pick-up points, and reducing cash payments.
 
  1. Implement rotational shift schedules where possible (e.g., increasing the number of shifts, alternating days or weeks) to reduce the number of workers in the facility at the same time.
 
  1. Stagger start times and meal times.
 
  1. Install temporary physical barriers, where practicable, between work stations and cafeteria tables.
 
  1. Create protocols for minimizing personal contact upon delivery of materials to the facility.
 
  1. Adopt protocols to limit the sharing of tools and equipment to the maximum extent possible.
 
  1. Frequently and thoroughly clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces, paying special attention to parts, products, and shared equipment (e.g., tools, machinery, vehicles).
 
  1. Ensure there are sufficient hand-washing or hand-sanitizing stations at the worksite to enable easy access by workers, and discontinue use of hand dryers.
 
  1. Notify plant leaders and potentially exposed individuals upon identification of a positive case of COVID-19 in the facility, as well as maintain a central log for symptomatic workers or workers who received a positive test for COVID-19.
 
  1. Send potentially exposed individuals home upon identification of a positive case of COVID-19 in the facility.
 
  1. Encourage workers to self-report to plant leaders as soon as possible after developing symptoms of COVID-19.
 
  1. Shut areas of the manufacturing facility for cleaning and disinfection, as necessary, if a worker goes home because he or she is displaying symptoms of COVID-19.
 
  1. Any store that remains open for in-store sales under section 9(f) or section 10(c) of this order:
 
  1. Must establish lines to regulate entry in accordance with subsection (b) of this section, with markings for patrons to enable them to stand at least six feet apart from one another while waiting. Stores should also explore alternatives to lines, including by allowing customers to wait in their cars for a text message or phone call, to enable social distancing and to accommodate seniors and those with disabilities.
 
  1. Must adhere to the following restrictions:
 
  1. For stores of less than 50,000 square feet of customer floor space, must limit the number of people in the store (including employees) to 25% of the total occupancy limits established by the State Fire Marshal or a local fire marshal.
 
  1. For stores of more than 50,000 square feet, must:
 
  1. Limit the number of customers in the store at one time (excluding employees) to 4 people per 1,000 square feet of customer floor space.
 
  1. Create at least two hours per week of dedicated shopping time for vulnerable populations, which for purposes of this order are people over 60, pregnant women, and those with chronic conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease.
 
  1. The director of the Department of Health and Human Services is authorized to issue an emergency order varying the capacity limits described in this subsection as necessary to protect the public health.
 
  1. May continue to sell goods other than necessary supplies if the sale of such goods is in the ordinary course of business.
 
  1. Must consider establishing curbside pick-up to reduce in-store traffic and mitigate outdoor lines.
 
  1. No one shall rent a short-term vacation property except as necessary to assist in housing a health care professional aiding in the response to the COVID-19 pandemic or a volunteer who is aiding the same.
 
  1. Michigan state parks remain open for day use, subject to any reductions in services and specific closures that, in the judgment of the director of the Department of Natural Resources, are necessary to minimize large gatherings and to prevent the spread of COVID-19.
 
  1. Rules governing face coverings.
 
  1. Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, any individual able to medically tolerate a face covering must wear a covering over his or her nose and mouth—such as a homemade mask, scarf, bandana, or handkerchief—when in any enclosed public space.
 
  1. An individual may be required to temporarily remove a face covering upon entering an enclosed public space for identification purposes.
 
  1. All businesses and operations whose workers perform in-person work must, at a minimum, provide non-medical grade face coverings to their workers.
 
  1. Supplies of N95 masks and surgical masks should generally be reserved, for now, for health care professionals, first responders (e.g., police officers, fire fighters, paramedics), and other critical workers who interact with the public.
     
  2. The protections against discrimination in the Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act, 1976 PA 453, as amended, MCL 37.2101 et seq., and any other protections against discrimination in Michigan law, apply in full force to individuals who wear a face covering under this order.
 
  1. Nothing in this order should be taken to supersede another executive order or directive that is in effect, except to the extent this order imposes more stringent limitations on in-person work, activities, and interactions. Consistent with prior guidance, neither a place of religious worship nor its owner is subject to penalty under section 20 of this order for allowing religious worship at such place. No individual is subject to penalty under section 20 of this order for engaging in or traveling to engage in religious worship at a place of religious worship, or for violating section 15(a) of this order.
 
  1. Nothing in this order should be taken to interfere with or infringe on the powers of the legislative and judicial branches to perform their constitutional duties or exercise their authority. Similarly, nothing in this order shall be taken to abridge protections guaranteed by the state or federal constitution under these emergency circumstances.
 
  1. This order takes effect immediately, unless otherwise specified in this order, and continues through May 28, 2020 at 11:59 pm. Executive Order 2020-70 is rescinded. All references to that order in other executive orders, agency rules, letters of understanding, or other legal authorities shall be taken to refer to this order.
 
  1. I will evaluate the continuing need for this order prior to its expiration. In determining whether to maintain, intensify, or relax its restrictions, I will consider, among other things, (1) data on COVID-19 infections and the disease’s rate of spread; (2) whether sufficient medical personnel, hospital beds, and ventilators exist to meet anticipated medical need; (3) the availability of personal protective equipment for the health care workforce; (4) the state’s capacity to test for COVID-19 cases and isolate infected people; and (5) economic conditions in the state.
 
  1. Consistent with MCL 10.33 and MCL 30.405(3), a willful violation of this order is a misdemeanor.
 
 

Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State of Michigan.

Executive Order 2020-42 (COVID-19)

Temporary Requirement to Suspend Activities that are Not Necessary to Sustain or Protect Life

Rescission of Executive Order 2020-21

 
The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a respiratory disease that can result in serious illness or death. It is caused by a new strain of coronavirus not previously identified in humans and easily spread from person to person. There is currently no approved vaccine or antiviral treatment for this disease.
 
On March 10, 2020, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services identified the first two presumptive-positive cases of COVID-19 in Michigan. On that same day, I issued Executive Order 2020-4. This order declared a state of emergency across the state of Michigan under section 1 of article 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, the Emergency Management Act, 1976 PA 390, as amended, MCL 30.401 et seq., and the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945, 1945 PA 302, as amended, MCL 10.31 et seq.
 
In the three weeks that followed, the virus spread across Michigan, bringing deaths in the hundreds, confirmed cases in the thousands, and deep disruption to this state’s economy, homes, and educational, civic, social, and religious institutions. On April 1, 2020, in response to the widespread and severe health, economic, and social harms posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, I issued Executive Order 2020-33. This order expanded on Executive Order 2020-4 and declared both a state of emergency and a state of disaster across the State of Michigan under section 1 of article 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, the Emergency Management Act, and the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945.
 
The Emergency Management Act vests the governor with broad powers and duties to “cop[e] with dangers to this state or the people of this state presented by a disaster or emergency,” which the governor may implement through “executive orders, proclamations, and directives having the force and effect of law.” MCL 30.403(1)-(2). Similarly, the Emergency Powers of the Governor Act of 1945 provides that, after declaring a state of emergency, “the governor may promulgate reasonable orders, rules, and regulations as he or she considers necessary to protect life and property or to bring the emergency situation within the affected area under control.” MCL 10.31(1).
 
To suppress the spread of COVID-19, to prevent the state’s health care system from being overwhelmed, to allow time for the production of critical test kits, ventilators, and personal protective equipment, and to avoid needless deaths, it is reasonable and necessary to direct residents to remain at home or in their place of residence to the maximum extent feasible. To that end, on March 23, 2020, I issued Executive Order 2020-21, ordering all people in Michigan to stay home and stay safe. The order limited gatherings and travel, and required workers who are not necessary to sustain or protect life to stay home.
 
The measures put in place by Executive Order 2020-21 have been effective, but this virus is both aggressive and persistent: on April 8, 2020, Michigan reported 20,346 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 959 deaths from it. To win this fight, and to protect the health and safety of our state and each other, we must be just as aggressive and persistent. Though we have all made sacrifices, we must be steadfast. Accordingly, with this order, I find it reasonable and necessary to reaffirm the measures set forth in Executive Order 2020-21, clarify them, and extend their duration to April 30, 2020. This order takes effect on April 9, 2020 at 11:59 pm. When this order takes effect, Executive Order 2020-21 is rescinded.
 
 
Acting under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, I order the following:
 
  1. This order must be construed broadly to prohibit in-person work that is not necessary to sustain or protect life.
 
  1. Subject to the exceptions in section 7 of this order, all individuals currently living within the State of Michigan are ordered to stay at home or at their place of residence. Subject to the same exceptions, all public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring among persons not part of a single household are prohibited.
 
  1. All individuals who leave their home or place of residence must adhere to social distancing measures recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”), including remaining at least six feet from people from outside the individual’s household to the extent feasible under the circumstances.
 
  1. No person or entity shall operate a business or conduct operations that require workers to leave their homes or places of residence except to the extent that those workers are necessary to sustain or protect life or to conduct minimum basic operations.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, workers who are necessary to sustain or protect life are defined as “critical infrastructure workers,” as described in sections 8 and 9 of this order.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, workers who are necessary to conduct minimum basic operations are those whose in-person presence is strictly necessary to allow the business or operation to maintain the value of inventory and equipment, care for animals, ensure security, process transactions (including payroll and employee benefits), or facilitate the ability of other workers to work remotely.
 
Businesses and operations must determine which of their workers are necessary to conduct minimum basic operations and inform such workers of that designation. Businesses and operations must make such designations in writing, whether by electronic message, public website, or other appropriate means. Workers need not carry copies of their designations when they leave the home or place of residence for work.
 
Any in-person work necessary to conduct minimum basic operations must be performed consistently with the social distancing practices and other mitigation measures described in section 10 of this order.
 
  1. Businesses and operations that employ critical infrastructure workers may continue in-person operations, subject to the following conditions:
 
  1. Consistent with sections 8 and 9 of this order, businesses and operations must determine which of their workers are critical infrastructure workers and inform such workers of that designation. Businesses and operations must make such designations in writing, whether by electronic message, public website, or other appropriate means. Workers need not carry copies of their designations when they leave the home or place of residence for work. Businesses and operations need not designate:
 
  1. Workers in health care and public health.
 
  1. Workers who perform necessary government activities, as described in section 6 of this order.
 
  1. Workers and volunteers described in section 9(d) of this order.
 
  1. In-person activities that are not necessary to sustain or protect life must be suspended until normal operations resume.
 
  1. Businesses and operations maintaining in-person activities must adopt social distancing practices and other mitigation measures to protect workers and patrons, as described in section 10 of this order. Stores that are open to the public must also adhere to the rules described in section 11 of this order.
 
  1. All in-person government activities at whatever level (state, county, or local) that are not necessary to sustain or protect life, or to support those businesses and operations that are necessary to sustain or protect life, are suspended.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, necessary government activities include activities performed by critical infrastructure workers, including workers in law enforcement, public safety, and first responders.
 
  1. Such activities also include, but are not limited to, public transit, trash pick-up and disposal (including recycling and composting), activities necessary to manage and oversee elections, operations necessary to enable transactions that support the work of a business’s or operation’s critical infrastructure workers, and the maintenance of safe and sanitary public parks so as to allow for outdoor activity permitted under this order.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, necessary government activities include minimum basic operations, as described in section 4(b) of this order. Workers performing such activities need not be designated.
 
  1. Any in-person government activities must be performed consistently with the social distancing practices and other mitigation measures to protect workers and patrons described in section 10 of this order.
 
  1. Exceptions.
     
    1. Individuals may leave their home or place of residence, and travel as necessary:
       
      1. To engage in outdoor physical activity, consistent with remaining at least six feet from people from outside the individual’s household. Outdoor physical activity includes walking, hiking, running, cycling, kayaking, canoeing, or other similar physical activity, as well as any comparable activity for those with limited mobility.
 
  1. To perform their jobs as critical infrastructure workers after being so designated by their employers. (Critical infrastructure workers who need not be designated under section 5(a) of this order may leave their home for work without being designated.)
 
  1. To conduct minimum basic operations, as described in section 4(b) of this order, after being designated to perform such work by their employers.
 
  1. To perform necessary government activities, as described in section 6 of this order.
 
  1. To perform tasks that are necessary to their health and safety, or to the health and safety of their family or household members (including pets). Individuals may, for example, leave the home or place of residence to secure medication or to seek medical or dental care that is necessary to address a medical emergency or to preserve the health and safety of a household or family member (including procedures that, in accordance with a duly implemented nonessential procedures postponement plan, have not been postponed).
 
  1. To obtain necessary services or supplies for themselves, their family or household members, their pets, and their vehicles.
 
  1. Individuals must secure such services or supplies via delivery to the maximum extent possible. As needed, however, individuals may leave the home or place of residence to purchase groceries, take-out food, gasoline, needed medical supplies, and any other products necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and basic operation of their residences. Individuals may also leave the home to drop off a vehicle to the extent permitted under section 9(i) of this order.
 
  1. Individuals should limit, to the maximum extent that is safe and feasible, the number of household members who leave the home for any errands.
 
  1. To care for a family member or a family member’s pet in another household.
 
  1. To care for minors, dependents, the elderly, persons with disabilities, or other vulnerable persons.
 
  1. To visit an individual under the care of a health care facility, residential care facility, or congregate care facility, to the extent otherwise permitted.
 
  1. To attend legal proceedings or hearings for essential or emergency purposes as ordered by a court.
 
  1. To work or volunteer for businesses or operations (including both religious and secular nonprofit organizations) that provide food, shelter, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals, individuals who need assistance as a result of this emergency, and people with disabilities.
 
  1. To attend a funeral, provided that no more than 10 people are in attendance at the funeral.
 
  1. Individuals may also travel:
     
    1. To return to a home or place of residence from outside this state.
       
    2. To leave this state for a home or residence elsewhere.
 
  1. Between two residences in this state, through April 10, 2020. After that date, travel between two residences is not permitted.
 
  1. As required by law enforcement or a court order, including the transportation of children pursuant to a custody agreement.
 
  1. All other travel is prohibited, including all travel to vacation rentals.
     
  2. For purposes of this order, critical infrastructure workers are those workers described by the Director of the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency in his guidance of March 19, 2020 on the COVID-19 response (available here). This order does not adopt any subsequent guidance document released by this same agency.
 
Consistent with the March 19, 2020 guidance document, critical infrastructure workers include some workers in each of the following sectors:
 
  1. Health care and public health.
 
  1. Law enforcement, public safety, and first responders.
 
  1. Food and agriculture.
 
  1. Energy.
 
  1. Water and wastewater.
 
  1. Transportation and logistics.
 
  1. Public works.
 
  1. Communications and information technology, including news media.
 
  1. Other community-based government operations and essential functions.
 
  1. Critical manufacturing.
 
  1. Hazardous materials.
 
  • Financial services.
 
  1. Chemical supply chains and safety.
 
  • Defense industrial base.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, critical infrastructure workers also include:
 
  1. Child care workers (including workers at disaster relief child care centers), but only to the extent necessary to serve the children or dependents of workers required to perform in-person work as permitted under this order. This category includes individuals (whether licensed or not) who have arranged to care for the children or dependents of such workers.
 
  1. Workers at suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers, as described below.
 
  1. Any suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate another business’s or operation’s critical infrastructure work may designate their workers as critical infrastructure workers, provided that only those workers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate such work may be so designated.
 
  1. Any suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the necessary work of suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers described in subprovision (1) of this subsection may designate their workers as critical infrastructure workers, provided that only those workers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate such work may be so designated.
 
  1. Consistent with the scope of work permitted under subprovision (2) of this subsection, any suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers further down the supply chain whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the necessary work of other suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers may likewise designate their workers as critical infrastructure workers, provided that only those workers whose in-person presence is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate such work may be so designated.
 
  1. Suppliers, distribution centers, and service providers that abuse their designation authority under this subsection shall be subject to sanctions to the fullest extent of the law.
 
  1. Workers in the insurance industry, but only to the extent that their work cannot be done by telephone or remotely.
 
  1. Workers and volunteers for businesses or operations (including both religious and secular nonprofit organizations) that provide food, shelter, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals, individuals who need assistance as a result of this emergency, and people with disabilities.
 
  1. Workers who perform critical labor union functions, including those who administer health and welfare funds and those who monitor the well-being and safety of union members who are critical infrastructure workers, provided that any administration or monitoring should be done by telephone or remotely where possible.
 
  1. Workers at retail stores who sell groceries, medical supplies, and products necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and basic operation of residences, including convenience stores, pet supply stores, auto supplies and repair stores, hardware and home maintenance stores, and home appliance retailers.
 
  1. Workers at laundromats, coin laundries, and dry cleaners.
 
  1. Workers at hotels and motels, provided that the hotels or motels do not offer additional in-house amenities such as gyms, pools, spas, dining, entertainment facilities, meeting rooms, or like facilities.
 
  1. Workers at motor vehicle dealerships who are necessary to facilitate remote and electronic sales or leases, or to deliver motor vehicles to customers, provided that showrooms remain closed to in-person traffic.
 
  1. Businesses, operations, and government agencies that continue in-person work must adhere to sound social distancing practices and measures, which include but are not limited to:
 
  1. Developing a COVID-19 preparedness and response plan, consistent with recommendations in Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19, developed by the Occupational Health and Safety Administration and available here. Such plan must be available at company headquarters or the worksite.
 
  1. Restricting the number of workers present on premises to no more than is strictly necessary to perform the business’s, operation’s, or government agency’s critical infrastructure functions or its minimum basic operations.
 
  1. Promoting remote work to the fullest extent possible.
 
  1. Keeping workers and patrons who are on premises at least six feet from one another to the maximum extent possible.
 
  1. Increasing standards of facility cleaning and disinfection to limit worker and patron exposure to COVID-19, as well as adopting protocols to clean and disinfect in the event of a positive COVID-19 case in the workplace.
 
  1. Adopting policies to prevent workers from entering the premises if they display respiratory symptoms or have had contact with a person with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19.
 
  1. Any other social distancing practices and mitigation measures recommended by the CDC.
 
  1. Any store that remains open for in-person sales under section 5 or 9(f) of this order must:
 
  1. Establish lines to regulate entry in accordance with subsections (c) and (d) of this section, with markings for patrons to enable them to stand at least six feet apart from one another while waiting. Stores should also explore alternatives to lines, including by allowing customers to wait in their cars for a text message or phone call, to enable social distancing and to accommodate seniors and those with disabilities.
 
  1. Consider establishing curbside pick-up to reduce in-store traffic and mitigate outdoor lines.
 
  1. For stores of less than 50,000 square feet of customer floor space, limit the number of people in the store (including employees) to 25% of the total occupancy limits established by the State Fire Marshal or a local fire marshal.
 
  1. For stores of more than 50,000 square feet:
 
  1. Limit the number of customers in the store at one time (excluding employees) to 4 people per 1,000 square feet of customer floor space. The amount of customer floor space must be calculated to exclude store areas that are closed under subprovision (2) of this subsection.
 
  1. Close areas of the store—by cordoning them off, placing signs in aisles, posting prominent signs, removing goods from shelves, or other appropriate means—that are dedicated to the following classes of goods:
 
  1. Carpet or flooring.
 
  1. Furniture.
 
  1. Garden centers and plant nurseries.
 
  1. Paint.
 
  1. By April 13, 2020, refrain from the advertising or promotion of goods that are not groceries, medical supplies, or items that are necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and basic operation of residences.
 
  1. Create at least two hours per week of dedicated shopping time for vulnerable populations, which for purposes of this order are people over 60, pregnant women, and those with chronic conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease.
 
  1. The director of the Department of Health and Human Services is authorized to issue an emergency order varying the capacity limits described in subsections (c) and (d) of this section as necessary to protect the public health.
 
  1. No one shall advertise or rent a short-term vacation property except as necessary to assist in housing a health care professional or volunteer aiding in the response to the COVID-19 crisis.
 
  1. Nothing in this order should be taken to supersede another executive order or directive that is in effect, except to the extent this order imposes more stringent limitations on in-person work, activities, and interactions. Consistent with prior guidance, a place of religious worship, when used for religious worship, is not subject to penalty under section 17 of this order.
 
  1. Nothing in this order should be taken to interfere with or infringe on the powers of the legislative and judicial branches to perform their constitutional duties or exercise their authority.
 
  1. This order takes effect on April 9, 2020 at 11:59 pm and continues through April 30, 2020 at 11:59 pm. When this order takes effect, Executive Order 2020-21 is rescinded. All references to that order in other executive orders, agency rules, letters of understanding, or other legal authorities shall be taken to refer to this order.
 
  1. I will evaluate the continuing need for this order prior to its expiration. In determining whether to maintain, intensify, or relax its restrictions, I will consider, among other things, (1) data on COVID-19 infections and the disease’s rate of spread; (2) whether sufficient medical personnel, hospital beds, and ventilators exist to meet anticipated medical need; (3) the availability of personal protective equipment for the health-care workforce; (4) the state’s capacity to test for COVID-19 cases and isolate infected people; and (5) economic conditions in the state.
 
  1. Consistent with MCL 10.33 and MCL 30.405(3), a willful violation of this order is a misdemeanor.
 
Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State of Michigan.

Executive Order 2020-35 (COVID-19)

Provision of K-12 education during the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year

The COVID-19 pandemic has already required, among other things, the closure of elementary and secondary schools throughout the state. Given virus’s aggressively persistent spread and potentially fatal consequences, in-person instruction in our schools is too dangerous to resume in the near future, and very likely for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year. Nonetheless, as section 1 of article 8 of the Michigan Constitution provides, “schools and the means of education shall forever be encouraged.” In the face of this pandemic, the education of K-12 students must continue as fully and effectively as possible. While there is no substitute for a highly trained and experienced teacher interacting with students in a classroom, schools must continue to provide, and students must continue to receive, the highest level of educational opportunities possible under the difficult circumstances now before us. To do so, schools and students alike must be enabled to innovate and adapt, and those efforts must not be unduly inhibited by requirements or restrictions that are misplaced in this time of unprecedented crisis.
 
Accordingly, to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, protect the health and safety of this state and its residents, and ensure the ongoing encouragement of education enshrined in this state’s constitution, it is reasonable and necessary to temporarily suspend in-person instruction of K-12 students and provide limited and temporary relief from certain restrictions and requirements so that K-12 education may continue by the best alternative means possible.
 
 
Acting under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, I order the following:
 
I.   Suspension of in-person K-12 instruction for the remainder of 2019-2020 school year
A.  Except as provided in section III of this order, in-person instruction for pupils in kindergarten through grade 12 (“K-12”) is suspended for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year and school buildings used for the provision of K-12 education must remain closed for the purpose of providing K-12 education in person for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year, unless restrictions on public gatherings and use of school buildings are lifted before the end of the 2019-2020 school year. K-12 school sports activities and other in-person extracurricular school activities are suspended while any state of emergency or state of disaster prompted by COVID-19 is in effect. This section I.A applies to all public, nonpublic, and boarding schools in the state.
B.  For a district implementing a Continuity of Learning and COVID-19 Response Plan (“Plan”) pursuant to section II of this order, all of the following apply:
1.   Strict compliance with rules and procedures under subdivisions (d) to (f) of subsection (3) of section 101 of the State School Aid Act of 1979 (“School Aid Act”), 1979 PA 94, as amended, MCL 388.1701(3)(d) to (f), is temporarily suspended for the period beginning on March 11, 2020 and ending on the last day of the 2019-2020 school year, so as to waive any requirement that a district have a minimum number of the district’s membership in attendance on any day of pupil instruction and waive any requirement that a district report the percentage of the district’s membership in attendance to the Department of Education (“Department”).
2.   Strict compliance with rules and procedures under sections 101(3)(a), 101(3)(b), 101(4), 101(6), and 101(10) of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1701(3)(a), 388.1701(3)(b), 388.1701(4), 388.1701(6), and 388.1701(10), requiring a district to provide at least 1,098 hours and 180 days of pupil instruction, is temporarily suspended so as to provide for the following additional exceptions to the requirement to provide at least 1,098 hours and 180 days of pupil instruction that must be counted as hours and days of pupil instruction:
(a)  In addition to counting as hours and days of pupil instruction under section 101(4) of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1701(4), the first six days or the equivalent number of hours for which pupil instruction is not provided because of conditions not within the control of school authorities, the Department shall count up to 13 additional days or the equivalent number of hours for which pupil instruction is not provided due to a closure of schools pursuant to an executive order issued by the governor in response to the COVID-19 state of emergency and/or state of disaster.
(b)  Under section 101(10) of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1701(10), a district also may count an additional five days or the equivalent number of hours used for the purpose of preparing to provide and providing instruction by alternative modes of instruction pursuant to a Plan as days or an equivalent number of hours of pupil instruction.
3.   Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 101(9) of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1701(9), is temporarily suspended so as to permit a district that has a Department-approved alternative education program or another innovative program approved by the Department under MCL 388.1701(9) and that does not use a 100% online model of delivery approved before the effective date of this order to use the additional exceptions provided for in section I.B.2 of this order in satisfying the number of days and hours of instruction required under a waiver granted by the Department under section 101(9).
4.   Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 101(9) of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1701(9), is temporarily suspended so as to waive the minimum number of hours and days of pupil instruction required under section 101(3) of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1701(3), for any district with a Plan approved under section II of this order. A district with a Plan approved under section II of this order will be considered to be operating a Department-approved alternative education program or another innovative program approved by the Department for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year only. A district with a Plan approved under section II of this order is not subject to forfeiture of money under section 101 of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1701. If the district does not comply substantially with the terms of the Plan, the amount of any forfeiture under MCL 388.1701 will be calculated based upon a comparison of the number of hours and days of pupil instruction provided to the minimum number of hours and days of pupil instruction required under MCL 388.1701(3), as affected by this order. A district with a Plan approved under section II of this order is not required to report to the Center the pupils enrolled in a Department-approved alternative education program under MCL 388.1701(9).
C.  A school of excellence that is a cyber school, as defined in section 551 of the Revised School Code (“School Code”), 1976 PA 451, as amended, MCL 380.551, and is in compliance with section 553a of the School Code, MCL 380.553a, may continue to educate pupils in a manner consistent with section I.A of this order, and continues to be exempt from the requirements of subsections (3) and (8) of section 101 of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1701(3) and (8).
D.  If before March 11, 2020, a district was providing nonessential elective courses to nonpublic school and/or homeschool pupils at either a district, intermediate district, or nonpublic school site pursuant to section 166b of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1766b, and is able to continue to offer the nonessential elective courses through alternative modes of instruction, then the district may, to the extent feasible, provide for such courses in its Plan and continue to offer the nonessential elective courses to nonpublic school and/or homeschool pupils through alternative modes of instruction for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year.
E.  Nothing in this order alters the inapplicability of subsections (3) and (8) of section 101 of the School Aid Act, MCL 380.1701(3) and (8), to eligible pupils enrolled in a dropout recovery program that meets the requirements of section 23a of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1623a. As used in this section I.E, “eligible pupil” means that term as defined in MCL 388.1623a.
F.   The approval of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (“Superintendent”) or the Department is not required for a district to make use of a waiver provided for under section I.B of this order.
G.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 6(7)(b) of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1606(7)(b), is temporarily suspended to eliminate the requirement during the 2019-2020 school year for a district or intermediate district maintaining school during the entire school year to use the fourth Wednesday in April as a pupil membership count day.
H.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under sections 1284 and 1284a of the School Code, MCL 380.1284 and 380.1284a, is temporarily suspended as necessary to facilitate implementation of this section I.
I.    Strict compliance with rules and procedures under 104b(4)(b) of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1704b(4)(b), is temporarily suspended as necessary to permit a district to include each day that a pupil is deemed in attendance under this section I or pursuant to a Plan under section II of this order as a day the pupil was in attendance at school during the 2019-2020 school year for purposes of MCL 388.1704b(4)(b).
II.  Continuity of Learning and COVID-19 Response Plans
A.  By April 3, 2020, the Department, in collaboration with the Michigan Association of Intermediate School Administrators and the Michigan Council of Charter School Authorizers, shall develop and distribute a model template for a Plan provided for in this section II.
B.  A Plan must include all of the following elements and be consistent with the requirements of this order:
1.   A description of the methods a district will use to provide alternative modes of instruction other than in-person instruction and a summary of materials each pupil and the pupil’s parents or guardians will need to meaningfully access the alternative modes of instruction included in the Plan. If the Plan relies on electronic instruction, the Plan must ensure to the extent feasible that pupils have access to a connected device capable of accessing the electronic instruction and must not penalize a pupil for the pupil’s inability to fully participate.
2.   A description of the methods a district will use to keep pupils at the center of educational activities, including outreach to continue building relationships and maintain connections, and to help pupils feel safe and valued.
3.   A description of plans to deliver content in multiple ways so that all pupils can access learning.
4.   A description of plans to manage and monitor learning by pupils.
5.   A budget outline estimating additional expenditures associated with the Plan and sources of revenue to pay for those expenditures.
6.   A description of the manner in which district administrators, board members, teachers, and any representatives of teachers collaborated in development of the Plan.
7.   A description of methods the district will use to notify pupils and parents or guardians of the Plan.
8.   A best estimate of the date on which the district will begin implementation of the Plan, which must be no later than April 28, 2020.
9.   Provide for assistance, to the extent feasible, to pupils enrolled in any postsecondary dual enrollment courses under the Postsecondary Enrollment Options Act, 1996 PA 160, as amended, MCL 388.511 to 388.524, and the Career and Technical Preparation Act, 2000 PA 258, as amended, MCL 388.1901 to 388.1913, in completing the courses during the 2019-2020 school year.
10. Provide or arrange for continuation of food distribution to eligible pupils.
11. Continue to pay school employees while redeploying staff to provide meaningful work in the context of the Plan, subject to any applicable requirements of a collective bargaining agreement.
12. Provide for evaluation of participation in the Plan by pupils.
13. Provide mental health supports to pupils affected by a state of emergency or state of disaster prompted by COVID-19.
14. Provide for the district to support the efforts of the intermediate district in which the district is located to mobilize disaster relief child care centers as described in Executive Order 2020-16 or any executive order that may follow it.
C.  A Plan may provide for the adoption of a balanced calendar instructional program for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year and planning for the adoption of a balanced calendar instructional program for the 2020-2021 school year.
D.  A district may contract with one or more providers for implementation of a Plan.
E.  If a district lacks the capacity to implement a Plan on its own, a district may partner with one or more other districts or intermediate districts. A district may enter into one or more cooperative agreements under section 11a(4) of the School Code, MCL 380.11a(4), to provide for implementation of a Plan.
F.   For a district that is not a public school academy, the district’s Plan must be approved by the intermediate superintendent of the intermediate district in which the district is located. For a district that is a public school academy, the district’s Plan must be approved by the authorizing body of the public school academy or the authorizing body’s designee for the purpose of administering contracts with public school academies. For a public school academy that by agreement provides public educational services for the residents of a district that does not directly provide public educational services to the residents on its own, the public school academy’s Plan must be approved by the intermediate superintendent of the intermediate district in which the public school academy is located. If an intermediate district educates K-12 students, the intermediate district may adopt a Plan for those activities and implement the Plan once adopted. A school of excellence that is a cyber school, as defined in section 551 of the School Code, MCL 380.551, and is in compliance with section 553a of the School Code, MCL 380.553a, may continue to educate pupils under its charter contract which will be that school’s Plan.
G.  An intermediate district or an authorizing body shall approve a Plan submitted by a district if the Plan complies with the requirements of this section II and if the intermediate district or authorizing body believes the Plan represents a good-faith effort to provide adequate alternative modes of instruction given the limitations resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic and accompanying response efforts. Intermediate districts and authorizing bodies must allow for flexibility and presume that a Plan submitted by a district will be implemented to the best of the district’s ability.
H.  Intermediate districts and authorizing bodies shall transmit copies of approved Plans to the Superintendent and to the State Treasurer. If a district or intermediate district maintains a public internet site, the district or intermediate district shall post its approved Plan on the internet site.
I.    An intermediate district may enter into a cooperate agreement with one or more other intermediate districts for the purpose of reviewing and approving Plans under this order.
J.   An intermediate district or authorizing body that reviews and approves or disapproves Plans on its own or with others pursuant to this section II will be eligible for any additional funding appropriated to support these activities. An intermediate district or authorizing body that does not review and approve or disapprove Plans will not be eligible for any additional funding appropriated.
K.  Intermediate districts and authorizing bodies must be prepared to review and approve or reject Plans beginning on April 8, 2020.
L.   A district with an approved Plan is eligible to receive continued payments from the State School Aid Fund for the 2019-2020 school year.
M.  A district that is not a public school academy may amend its Plan with the approval of the intermediate superintendent of the intermediate district in which the school district is located. A district that is a public school academy may amend its Plan with the approval of its authorizing body or its designee. For a public school academy that by agreement provides public educational services for the residents of a district that does not directly provide public educational services to the residents on its own, the public school academy’s Plan may be amended with the approval of the intermediate superintendent of the intermediate district in which the public school academy is located.
N.  Decisions regarding the awarding of credit, the issuance of grades, and the use of pass or fail designations will be made at the district level by districts with due recognition of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.
O.  State-approved nonpublic schools and parents and guardians homeschooling students are encouraged to do all of the following:
1.   Offer all students electronic, other remote, or home-based instruction, to the extent feasible, for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year, including course offerings provided by the Michigan Virtual School.
2.   Coordinate with districts providing nonessential elective courses under section 166b of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1766b, to any of their students for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year.
3.   Assist eligible nonpublic school students to complete postsecondary dual enrollment courses, to the extent feasible, under the Postsecondary Enrollment Options Act, 1996 PA 160, as amended, MCL 388.511 to 388.524, and the Career and Technical Preparation Act, 2000 PA 258, as amended, MCL 388.1901 to 388.1913.
4.   Take actions necessary to continue to receive any federal funding previously allocated in a manner consistent with applicable federal law.
 
III.  District employees permitted in district buildings
A.  Notwithstanding the closure of school buildings under Executive Order 2020-11 or any executive order that may follow it, district employees or contractors necessary to conduct minimum basic school operations consistent with a Plan, including those employers or contractors necessary to facilitate alternative modes of instruction, such as distributing materials and equipment, or performing other necessary in-person functions, are permitted to be physically present in district buildings, as determined by district administrators. District employees and contractors performing these functions are considered to be performing necessary government activities for purposes of Executive Order 2020-21 or any executive order that may follow it. Districts must adopt social distancing practices and other mitigation measures to protect district employees and contractors, including all of the following:
1.   Restricting the number of employees and contractors present in a district building to no more than is strictly necessary to perform the activities authorized by this section III.
2.   Promoting remote work to the fullest extent possible.
3.   Keeping employees and contractors in a district building at least six feet from one another to the maximum extent possible.
4.   Increasing standards of district building cleaning and disinfection to limit employee and contractor exposure to COVID-19, as well as adopting protocols to clean and disinfect in the event of a positive COVID-19 case in a district building.
5.   Adopting policies to prevent employees and contractors from entering the premises if they display respiratory symptoms or have had contact with a person who is known or suspected to have contracted COVID-19.
6.   Any other social distancing practices and mitigation measures relating to COVID-19 recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
B.  A district may permit parents and guardians of pupils to visit school property for the purpose of obtaining materials and equipment pursuant to a Plan and using the same social distancing and other mitigation measures required for district employees and contractors under section III.A. Parents or guardians leaving their homes or residences for this purpose are considered to be obtaining necessary services or supplies for purposes of Executive Order 2020-21 or any executive order that may follow it.
C.  Any child care workers at a child care located within a district building (including workers at disaster relief child care centers), are permitted to be physically present in district buildings, as determined by district administrators and to the extent permitted by Executive Order 2020-21 or any executive order that may follow it.
 
IV.  Assessments
A.  Plans are not required to address the following provisions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (“ESEA”) that have been waived by the United States Department of Education for the 2019-2020 school year pursuant to section 8401(b) of the ESEA, 20 USC 7861(b):
1.   Assessment requirements under section 1111(b)(2) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(b)(2).
2.   Report card provisions related to certain assessments and accountability in section 1111(h) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h) based on data from the 2019-2020 school year, including all of the following:
(a)  Section 1111(h)(1)(C)(i) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(1)(C)(i) (accountability system description).
(b)  Section 1111(h)(1)(C)(ii) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(1)(C)(ii) (assessment results).
(c)  Section 1111(h)(1)(C)(iii)(1) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(1)(C)(iii)(1) (other academic indicator results).
(d)  Section 1111(h)(1)(C)(iv) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(1)(C)(iv) (English language proficiency assessment results).
(e)  Section 1111(h)(1)(C)(v) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(1)(C)(v) (school quality or student success indicator results).
(f)   Section 1111(h)(1)(C)(vi) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(1)(C)(vi) (progress toward meeting long-terms goals and measurements of interim progress).
(g)  Section 1111(h)(1)(C)(vii) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(1)(C)(vii) (percentage of students assessed and not assessed).
(h)  Section 1111(h)(1)(C)(xi) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(1)(C)(xi), (number and percentage of students with the most significant cognitive disabilities taking an alternate assessment).
(i)   Section 1111(h)(2) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(2), with respect to all waived requirements in section 1111(h)(1)(C) of ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(1)(C).
(j)   Section 1111(h)(2)(C)(i) to (ii) of the ESEA, 20 USC 6311(h)(2)(C)(i) to (ii) (information showing how students in a local educational agency (“LEA”) and each school, respectively, achieved on the academic assessments compared to students in Michigan and the LEA).
B.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1279g of the School Code, MCL 380.1279g, and section 104b of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1704b, requiring a district to administer during the 2019-2020 school year the Michigan Merit Examination to pupils in grade 11 and to pupils in grade 12 who did not take the complete Michigan Merit Examination in grade 11, is temporarily suspended for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year. Pupils currently in grade 11 will be administered the Scholastic Aptitude Test portion of the Michigan Merit Examination during the school day in the fall of the 2020-2021 school year as permitted by the College Board, with results from this test being used for college entrance purposes but not for school accountability purposes.
C.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under sections 503(6)(a), 523(2)(a), 553(5)(a), and 1311e(5)(a) of the School Code, MCL 380.503(6)(a), 380.523(2)(a), 380.553(5)(a), and 380.1311e(5)(a), and under section 104c of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1704c, is temporarily suspended so as to suspend for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year the obligation of a district to administer the state assessments described in those sections, including the Michigan Student Test of Educational Progress (“M-STEP”), or an alternative to M-STEP such as the MI-ACCESS assessment, or other assessment taken in conjunction with the M-STEP, including the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (“PSAT”) developed by the College Board. Pupils otherwise scheduled to be administered the PSAT during the school day in the 2019-2020 school year will be administered the PSAT during the school day in the fall of the 2020-2021 school year as permitted by the College Board.
D.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 41 of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1641, is temporarily suspended so as to suspend for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year the obligation of a district to administer to English language learners the English language proficiency assessment known as the “WIDA ACCESS for English language learners” or the “WIDA Alternative ACCESS.”
E.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1279g of the School Code, MCL 380.1279g, is temporarily suspended so as to suspend for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year the obligation of a district, imposed by the Department or otherwise, to administer an assessment that assesses a pupil’s ability to apply reading and mathematics skills in a manner that is intended to allow employers to use the results in making employment decisions, including the WorkKeys assessment.
F.   Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 104 of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1704, is temporarily suspended so as to suspend any requirement for a district to administer the Maryland-Ohio observational tool, which is also referred to as the Kindergarten Readiness Assessment.
G.  Pupils enrolled in advanced placement courses and eligible to take examinations for advanced placement courses administered by the College Board must be permitted to take the examinations using the at-home testing option provided by the College Board. Districts shall facilitate, to the extent feasible, access to information relating to advanced placement courses and course schedules provided online by the College Board. For pupils without access to the internet or a device necessary to access the internet, districts shall facilitate, to the extent feasible, access to information regarding assistance provided by the College Board in completing examination requirements. Information relating to advanced placement courses and examinations is available at: apstudents.collegeboard.org/coronavirus-updates.
H.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1249, 1249a, 1249b, and 1250(1) of the School Code, MCL 380.1249, 380.1249a, 380.1249b, and 380.1250(1), and under section 104 of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1704, is temporarily suspended so as to waive any requirement for assessments or other performance evaluations of teachers and district administrators during the 2019-2020 school year.
I.    Strict compliance with rules and procedures under subsections (3) and (4) of section 1250 of the School Code, MCL 380.1250(3) and (4), is temporarily suspended for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year.
V.  Pupils in grade 12
A.  A district shall implement a process to issue grades to pupils in grade 12, award credits needed for graduation, provide for completion of the Michigan Merit Curriculum, issue diplomas to pupils in grade 12, and reflect continued learning by pupils in grade 12 pursuant to this order. When implementing this section V.A, a district may, without limitation, use one or more of the following options:
1.   Award credits and grades for courses taken based on coursework through March 11, 2020.
2.   Provide an optional final exam or other culminating activity to test pupil understanding of the subject matter of a course to the extent practicable.
3.   Implement a process for pupils in grade 12 to be certified as eligible to graduate using a prior learning assessment, a portfolio, or a resume approach.
4.   Offer an interdisciplinary culminating activity that encompasses essential standards missed by pupils due to the closure of schools.
B.  Districts must provide a pupil in grade 12 who was failing a course as of March 11, 2020 an opportunity to the extent feasible to demonstrate learning in the subject matter of the course and receive credit for the course, as determined by the district.
C.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1166(2) of the School Code, MCL 380.1166(2), is temporarily suspended for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year so as to suspend the restriction on a high school from issuing a diploma to a pupil who has not completed a one-semester course of study of five periods per week in civics.
D.  If before March 11, 2020, a district was providing a nonessential elective course to a nonpublic school pupil or homeschool pupil in grade 12 at either a district, intermediate district, or nonpublic school site pursuant to section 166b of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1766b, and that course is required for the pupil to graduate and receive a diploma, the district must, to the extent feasible, continue to offer the nonessential elective course to the pupil through alternative modes of instruction for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year.
VI.  Special education
A.  Districts shall strive in good faith and to the extent practicable, based upon existing resources, technology, training, and curriculum, as well as the circumstances presented by any state of emergency or state of disaster, to provide equal access to alternative modes of instruction to students with disabilities for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year. This includes the provision of auxiliary services under section 1296 of the School Code, MCL 380.1296.
B.  While the COVID-19 state of emergency and/or state of disaster continues, districts shall comply with guidance from the United States Department of Education (“USDOE”), including its Office of Civil Rights and Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, and the Department concerning the delivery of alternative modes of instruction to students with disabilities in light of the impact of COVID-19.
C.  Districts shall, to the extent practicable and necessary, make individualized determinations whether and to what extent compensatory services may be needed for pupils after the school closure period prompted by the COVID-19 state of emergency and/or state of disaster ends.
D.  A district or a nonpublic school that has been allocated federal funds for the 2019-2020 school year for the purpose of providing special education services shall not be penalized or required to repay the funds by this state due to the inability to provide those services in person during the 2019-2020 school year after March 11, 2020.
E.  Within five days of the effective date of this order, the Department and the Department of Civil Rights are strongly encouraged to submit requests for interpretation, guidance on implementation, flexibility, or waivers to USDOE that would permit districts and nonpublic schools to do one or more of the following during the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year:
1.   Deliver instruction to all pupils, including students with disabilities, without having to reconvene or amend individualized education plans (“IEPs”) or Section 504 plans.
2.   Deliver direct and consultative related services such as therapies, including occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech language pathologist, social service worker, teacher consultant, and other special education services and supports, without having to reconvene or amend IEPs or Section 504 plans.
3.   Complete IEPs and Section 504 plans online, either by telephone conference or video conference, if the parents or guardians involved have access to the technology and agree to the alternative means of participation. If a parent or guardian elects not to participate in an otherwise due IEP online, a district should be permitted to extend the deadline for completion of the IEP for up to 30 school days after the school closure period prompted by the COVID-19 state of emergency and/or state of disaster ends.
4.   Complete annual or otherwise due IEPs online, either by telephone conference or video conference, with those IEPs being considered timely if they are completed by the end of the 2019-2020 school year.
5.   Consider whether a pupil should be provided compensatory education for pupils after the school closure period prompted by the COVID-19 state of emergency and/or state of disaster ends, based on applicable law and guidance, no later than the first annual IEP meeting of the 2020-2021 school year.
6.   Consider compensatory education for pupils who are more likely to qualify for compensatory education through IEP amendments, with the authority to complete those IEP amendments online, either by telephone conference, virtual meetings, or other existing technology.
7.   Other requests the Department deems necessary to facilitate the delivery of alternative modes of instruction with equal access.
F.   This order does not require that an IEP be amended.
VII.  Temporary suspension of certain requirements relating to the suspension of administrative rules by the Superintendent
A.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1281(3) of the School Code, MCL 380.1281(3), is temporarily suspended so as to suspend for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year the requirement that a district, university school, or intermediate district apply for a limited time waiver from a Department rule interpreting or implementing a provision of the School Code and so as permit the Superintendent to temporarily suspend a Department rule interpreting or implementing a provision of the Code to facilitate the implementation of this order or other orders or response efforts prompted by the COVID-19 state of emergency and/or state of disaster.
B.  The Superintendent may not grant a waiver from the duty to comply with a provision of the School Code and may not grant a waiver from the duty to comply with another state statute unless and to the extent that a waiver is specifically allowed by that other state statute.
VIII.  Temporary suspension of certain certification and continuing learning requirements
A.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1531(2) of the School Code, MCL 380.1531(2), is temporarily suspended so as to permit the Superintendent to issue a temporary one-year teaching certificate to an otherwise qualified individual who is unable to take an appropriate subject area examination required by MCL 380.1531(2) due to COVID-19 or accompanying response efforts.
B.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1531(3) of the School Code, MCL 380.1531(3), is temporarily suspended so as to permit the Superintendent to issue a temporary one-year teaching certificate to an individual holding a teaching certificate from another state or a teaching degree from an out-of-state teacher preparation institution who applies for a Michigan teaching certificate, is otherwise qualified, but is unable to take an appropriate subject area examination required by MCL 380.1531(3) because the examination is not offered  due to COVID-19 or accompanying response efforts.
C.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1531d of the School Code, MCL 380.1531d, is temporarily suspended so as to permit the Superintendent to temporarily waive the requirement that a person seeking a teaching certificate successfully complete a course approved by the Department in first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation and instruction approved by the Department in foreign body airway obstruction management when the person is unable to complete the course and/or the instruction because the course and/or the instruction is not offered due to COVID-19 or accompanying response efforts.
D.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1531i(2)(c) of the School Code, MCL 380.1531i(2)(c), is temporarily suspended so as to permit the Superintendent to issue an interim teaching certificate to an otherwise qualified individual who is unable to take an appropriate subject area examination required by MCL 380.1531i(2)(c) because the examination is not offered due to COVID-19 or accompanying response efforts.
E.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under Rule 390.1130(6) and (7) of the Michigan Administrative Code is temporarily suspended so as to permit the Superintendent to extend the duration of a 1-year temporary teacher employment authorization by an additional year if the holder of the 1-year temporary teacher employment authorization is unable to complete the requirements to obtain a Michigan teaching certificate because the requirements cannot be satisfied due to COVID-19 or accompanying response efforts.
F.   Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1526 of the School Code, MCL 380.1526, is temporarily suspended so as to waive for any teacher within his or her third year of employment the requirement that the teacher receive at least 15 days of professional development within the teacher’s first three years of employment if the requirement could not be completed due to COVID-19 or accompanying response efforts.
G.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1527(1) of the School Code, MCL 380.1527(1), is temporarily suspended so as to waive the requirement for the 2019-2020 school year that a district or intermediate district provide at least five days of teacher professional development each year.
H.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1233(6) of the School Code, MCL 380.1233(6), is temporarily suspended so as to permit the Department to renew an individual's school counselor credential regardless of whether the individual has completed at least 25 hours of professional development approved by the Department under MCL 380.1233(8) covering counseling about the college preparation and selection process and at least 25 hours of professional development approved by the Department under MCL 380.1233(8) covering career counseling.
IX.  Implementation
A.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 21f of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1621f, is temporarily suspended so as to permit a district pursuant to an approved Plan to enroll a pupil in more than 2 virtual courses, regardless of whether the virtual course is published in a catalog of courses or a parent or guardian approves, and so as to suspend any requirement to comply with minimum requirements to count a pupil in membership established by the pupil accounting manual.
B.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1278a(4) of the School Code, MCL 380.1278a(4), is temporarily suspended so as to permit a district to determine a pupil has completed a credit without using subject area content expectations or guidelines developed by the Department.
C.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under section 1280f(5) of the School Code, MCL 380.1280f(5), is temporarily suspended so as to relieve a district of the obligations imposed by that provision for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year, including the obligation to retain a pupil in grade 3.
D.  Strict compliance with rules and procedures under sections 162 and 163 of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1762 and 388.1763, is temporarily suspended so as to prevent the forfeiture of funds resulting from the implementation of this order.
E.  To mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on educational outcomes, a district may adopt year-round school or a year-round program for the 2020-2021 school year or start the 2020-2021 school year before the first Monday in September. Strict compliance with rules and procedures under sections 1284a and 1284b of the School Code, MCL 380 1284a and 380.1284b, is temporarily suspended so as to permit a district to adopt year-round school, a year-round program, or an early start for the 2020-2021 school year. Adoption of measures provided in this section IX.E may be included by a district as part of the district’s Plan.
F.   Mandatory closure of schools relating to COVID-19 shall not affect an employer contribution, employee contribution, or the accrual of service credit under the Public School Employees Retirement Act of 1979, 1980 PA 300, as amended, MCL 38.1301 to 38.1467.
G   For a district with a collective bargaining agreement, this order must be implemented by the district in a manner consistent with the collective bargaining agreement.
H.  Before the Department, the Superintendent, or the Department of Civil Rights seeks any guidance, issues a waiver, seeks a waiver relating to this order, or suspends an administrative rule pursuant to this order, the Superintendent or the director of the Department of Civil Rights, as applicable, shall provide the governor in writing with a copy of the request or waiver and information relating to the request, waiver, or suspension, as required by section 8 of article 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963.
I.    To ensure management of district and intermediate district affairs and property in ways that will assist the response to the COVID-19 state of emergency and/or state of disaster, districts and intermediate districts are authorized and encouraged to donate medical personal protective equipment and supplies to healthcare providers and other necessary personnel engaged in response efforts to COVID-19.
J.   This order is effective immediately and continues through the end of the states of emergency and disaster declared in Executive Order 2020-33 or any other state of emergency or disaster declared in response to COVID-19 during the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year, with the exception of the provisions of this order relating to scheduling for the 2020-2021 school year, which will continue into the 2020-2021 school year for that purpose.
X.  Definitions
As used in this order:
A.  “Alternative modes of instruction” means modes of pupil instruction, other than in-person instruction, that may include, without limitation, partnerships with other districts or intermediate districts or community colleges or institutions of higher education, use of vendors, use of online learning, telephone communications, email, virtual instruction, videos, slideshows, project-based learning, use of instructional packets, or a hybrid of multiple modes of learning that still promote recommended practices for social distancing to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.
B.  “Center” means the Center for Educational Performance and Information referenced in section 94a of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1694a.
C.  “District” means a school district established under the School Code or a public school academy. District does not include an intermediate district, except for an intermediate district that educates K-12 students.
D.  “Intermediate district” means an intermediate school district established under part 7 of the School Code, MCL 380.601 to 380.705b.
E.  “Intermediate superintendent” means the superintendent of an intermediate district.
F.   “Membership” means that term as defined in section 6(4) of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1606(4).
G.  “Michigan Virtual School” means the Michigan Virtual School referenced in section 98 of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1698.
H.  “Public school academy” means that term as defined in section 5 of the School Code, MCL 380.5.
I.    “Pupil” means that term as defined in section 6(6) of the School Aid Act, MCL 388.1606(6).
J.   “Superintendent of Public Instruction” or “Superintendent” means the superintendent of public instruction described in section 3 of article 8 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963.
 
Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State of Michigan.

Executive Order 2020-21 (COVID-19) - Replaced with 2020-42

Temporary Requirement to Suspend Activities that are not necessary to sustain or protect life

To suppress the spread of COVID-19, to prevent the state’s health care system from being overwhelmed, to allow time for the production of critical test kits, ventilators, and personal protective equipment, and to avoid needless deaths, it is reasonable and necessary to direct residents to remain at home or in their place of residence to the maximum extent feasible.
 
This order takes effect on March 24, 2020 at 12:01 am, and continues through April 13, 2020 at 11:59 pm.
 
Acting under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, I order the following:
 
  1. This order must be construed broadly to prohibit in-person work that is not necessary to sustain or protect life.
 
  1. Subject to the exceptions in section 7, all individuals currently living within the State of Michigan are ordered to stay at home or at their place of residence. Subject to the same exceptions, all public and private gatherings of any number of people occurring among persons not part of a single household are prohibited.
 
  1. All individuals who leave their home or place of residence must adhere to social distancing measures recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including remaining at least six feet from people from outside the individual’s household to the extent feasible under the circumstances.
 
  1. No person or entity shall operate a business or conduct operations that require workers to leave their homes or places of residence except to the extent that those workers are necessary to sustain or protect life or to conduct minimum basic operations.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, workers who are necessary to sustain or protect life are defined as “critical infrastructure workers,” as described in sections 8 and 9.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, workers who are necessary to conduct minimum basic operations are those whose in-person presence is strictly necessary to allow the business or operation to maintain the value of inventory and equipment, care for animals, ensure security, process transactions (including payroll and employee benefits), or facilitate the ability of other workers to work remotely.

    Businesses and operations must determine which of their workers are necessary to conduct minimum basic operations and inform such workers of that designation. Businesses and operations must make such designations in writing, whether by electronic message, public website, or other appropriate means. Such designations, however, may be made orally until March 31, 2020 at 11:59 pm.
 
  1. Businesses and operations that employ critical infrastructure workers may continue in-person operations, subject to the following conditions:
 
  1. Consistent with sections 8 and 9, businesses and operations must determine which of their workers are critical infrastructure workers and inform such workers of that designation. Businesses and operations must make such designations in writing, whether by electronic message, public website, or other appropriate means. Such designations, however, may be made orally until March 31, 2020 at 11:59 pm. Businesses and operations need not designate:
 
  1. Workers in health care and public health.
 
  1. Workers who perform necessary government activities, as described in section 6.
 
  1. Workers and volunteers described in section 9(d).
 
  1. In-person activities that are not necessary to sustain or protect life must be suspended until normal operations resume.
 
  1. Businesses and operations maintaining in-person activities must adopt social distancing practices and other mitigation measures to protect workers and patrons. Those practices and measures include, but are not limited to:
 
  1. Restricting the number of workers present on premises to no more than is strictly necessary to perform the business’s or operation’s critical infrastructure functions.
 
  1. Promoting remote work to the fullest extent possible.
 
  1. Keeping workers and patrons who are on premises at least six feet from one another to the maximum extent possible, including for customers who are standing in line.
 
  1. Increasing standards of facility cleaning and disinfection to limit worker and patron exposure to COVID-19, as well as adopting protocols to clean and disinfect in the event of a positive COVID-19 case in the workplace.
 
  1. Adopting policies to prevent workers from entering the premises if they display respiratory symptoms or have had contact with a person who is known or suspected to have COVID-19.
 
  1. Any other social distancing practices and mitigation measures recommended by the Centers for Disease Control.
 
  1. All in-person government activities at whatever level (state, county, or local) that are not necessary to sustain or protect life, or to supporting those businesses and operations that are necessary to sustain or protect life, are suspended.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, necessary government activities include activities performed by critical infrastructure workers, including workers in law enforcement, public safety, and first responders.
 
  1. Such activities also include, but are not limited to, public transit, trash pick-up and disposal, activities necessary to manage and oversee elections, operations necessary to enable transactions that support the work of a business’s or operation’s critical infrastructure workers, and the maintenance of safe and sanitary public parks so as to allow for outdoor recreation.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, necessary government activities include minimum basic operations, as described in section 4(b). Workers performing such activities need not be designated.
 
  1. Any in-person government activities must be performed consistently with the social distancing practices and other mitigation measures to protect workers and patrons described in section 5(c).
 
  1. Exceptions.
    1. Individuals may leave their home or place of residence, and travel as necessary:
      1. To engage in outdoor activity, including walking, hiking, running, cycling, or any other recreational activity consistent with remaining at least six feet from people from outside the individual’s household.
 
  1. To perform their jobs as critical infrastructure workers after being so designated by their employers. (Critical infrastructure workers who need not be designated under section 5(a) may leave their home for work without a designation.)
 
  1. To conduct minimum basic operations, as described in section 4(b), after being designated to perform such work by their employers.
 
  1. To perform necessary government activities, as described in section 6.
 
  1. To perform tasks that are necessary to their health and safety, or to the health and safety of their family or household members (including pets). Individuals may, for example, leave the home or place of residence to secure medication or to seek medical or dental care that is necessary to address a medical emergency or to preserve the health and safety of a household or family member (including procedures that, in accordance with a duly implemented nonessential procedures postponement plan, have not been postponed).
 
  1. To obtain necessary services or supplies for themselves, their family or household members, and their vehicles. Individuals must secure such services or supplies via delivery to the maximum extent possible. As needed, however, individuals may leave the home or place of residence to purchase groceries, take-out food, gasoline, needed medical supplies, and any other products necessary to maintain the safety, sanitation, and basic operation of their residences.
 
  1. To care for a family member or a family member’s pet in another household.
 
  1. To care for minors, dependents, the elderly, persons with disabilities, or other vulnerable persons.
 
  1. To visit an individual under the care of a health care facility, residential care facility, or congregate care facility, to the extent otherwise permitted.
 
  1. To attend legal proceedings or hearings for essential or emergency purposes as ordered by a court.
 
  1. To work or volunteer for businesses or operations (including both and religious and secular nonprofit organizations) that provide food, shelter, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals, individuals who need assistance as a result of this emergency, and people with disabilities.
 
  1. Individuals may also travel:
    1. To return to a home or place of residence from outside this state.
       
    2. To leave this state for a home or residence elsewhere.
 
  1. To travel between two residences in this state.
     
  2. As required by law enforcement or a court order, including the transportation of children pursuant to a custody agreement.
     
  3. For purposes of this order, critical infrastructure workers are those workers described by the Director of the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency in his guidance of March 19, 2020 on the COVID-19 response (available here). Such workers include some workers in each of the following sectors:
 
  1. Health care and public health.
 
  1. Law enforcement, public safety, and first responders.
 
  1. Food and agriculture.
 
  1. Energy.
 
  1. Water and wastewater.
 
  1. Transportation and logistics.
 
  1. Public works.
 
  1. Communications and information technology, including news media.
 
  1. Other community-based government operations and essential functions.
 
  1. Critical manufacturing.
 
  1. Hazardous materials.
 
  1. Financial services.
 
  1. Chemical supply chains and safety.
 
  1. Defense industrial base.
 
  1. For purposes of this order, critical infrastructure workers also include:
 
  1. Child care workers (including workers at disaster relief child care centers), but only to the extent necessary to serve the children or dependents of critical infrastructure workers as defined in this order. This category includes individuals (whether licensed or not) who have arranged to care for the children or dependents of critical infrastructure workers.
 
  1. Workers at designated suppliers and distribution centers, as described below.
 
  1. A business or operation that employs critical infrastructure workers may designate suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the work of its critical infrastructure workers.
 
  1. Such suppliers, distribution centers, or service providers may designate workers as critical infrastructure workers only to the extent those workers are necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the work of the original operation’s or business’s critical infrastructure workers.
 
  1. Designated suppliers, distribution centers, and service providers may in turn designate additional suppliers, distribution centers, and service providers whose continued operation is necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the work of their critical infrastructure workers.
 
  1. Such additional suppliers, distribution centers, and service providers may designate workers as critical infrastructure workers only to the extent that those workers are necessary to enable, support, or facilitate the work of the critical infrastructure workers at the supplier, distribution center, or service provider that has designated them.
 
  1. Businesses, operations, suppliers, distribution centers, and service providers must make all designations in writing to the entities they are designating, whether by electronic message, public website, or other appropriate means. Such designations may be made orally until March 31, 2020 at 11:59 pm.
 
  1. Businesses, operations, suppliers, distribution centers, and service providers that abuse their designation authority shall be subject to sanctions to the fullest extent of the law.
 
  1. Workers in the insurance industry, but only to the extent that their work cannot be done by telephone or remotely.
 
  1. Workers and volunteers for businesses or operations (including both and religious and secular nonprofit organizations) that provide food, shelter, and other necessities of life for economically disadvantaged or otherwise needy individuals, individuals who need assistance as a result of this emergency, and people with disabilities.
 
  1. Workers who perform critical labor union functions, including those who administer health and welfare funds and those who monitor the well-being and safety of union members who are critical infrastructure workers, provided that any administration or monitoring should be done by telephone or remotely where possible.
 
  1. Nothing in this order should be taken to supersede another executive order or directive that is in effect, except to the extent this order imposes more stringent limitations on in-person work, activities, and interactions. Consistent with prior guidance, a place of religious worship, when used for religious worship, is not subject to penalty under section 14.
 
  1. Nothing in this order should be taken to interfere with or infringe on the powers of the legislative and judicial branches to perform their constitutional duties or exercise their authority.
 
  1. This order takes effect on March 24, 2020 at 12:01 am, and continues through April 13, 2020 at 11:59 pm.
 
  1. The governor will evaluate the continuing need for this order prior to its expiration. In determining whether to maintain, intensify, or relax its restrictions, she will consider, among other things, (1) data on COVID-19 infections and the disease’s rate of spread; (2) whether sufficient medical personnel, hospital beds, and ventilators exist to meet anticipated medical need; (3) the availability of personal protective equipment for the health-care workforce; (4) the state’s capacity to test for COVID-19 cases and isolate infected people; and (5) economic conditions in the state.
 
  1. Consistent with MCL 10.33 and MCL 30.405(3), a willful violation of this order is a misdemeanor.
 
 
Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State of Michigan.

Executive Order 2020-20 (COVID-19)

Temporary restrictions on the use of places of public accommodation

To mitigate the spread of COVID-19, protect the public health, and provide essential protections to vulnerable Michiganders, it is reasonable and necessary to impose limited and temporary restrictions on the use of places of public accommodation.
 
Executive Order 2020-9 imposed such restrictions. This order changes those restrictions by clarifying their application to facilities offering non-essential personal care services. When the restrictions in this order take effect, Executive Order 2020-9 is rescinded.
 
 
Acting under the Michigan Constitution of 1963 and Michigan law, I order the following:
 
  1. Beginning as soon as possible but no later than March 22, 2020 at 9:00 am, and continuing until April 13, 2020 at 11:59 pm, the following places of public accommodation are closed to ingress, egress, use, and occupancy by members of the public:
 
  1. Restaurants, food courts, cafes, coffeehouses, and other places of public accommodation offering food or beverage for on-premises consumption;
 
  1. Bars, taverns, brew pubs, breweries, microbreweries, distilleries, wineries, tasting rooms, special licensees, clubs, and other places of public accommodation offering alcoholic beverages for on-premises consumption;
 
  1. Hookah bars, cigar bars, and vaping lounges offering their products for on-premises consumption;
 
  1. Theaters, cinemas, and indoor and outdoor performance venues;
 
  1. Libraries and museums;
 
  1. Gymnasiums, fitness centers, recreation centers, indoor sports facilities, indoor exercise facilities, exercise studios, and facilities offering non-essential personal care services;
 
  1. Casinos licensed by the Michigan Gaming Control Board, racetracks licensed by the Michigan Gaming Control Board, and Millionaire Parties licensed by the Michigan Gaming Control Board; and
 
  1. Places of public amusement not otherwise listed above.
 
Places of public accommodation subject to this section are encouraged to offer food and beverage using delivery service, window service, walk-up service, drive-through service, or drive-up service, and to use precautions in doing so to mitigate the potential transmission of COVID-19, including social distancing. In offering food or beverage, a place of public accommodation subject to this section may permit up to five members of the public at one time in the place of public accommodation for the purpose of picking up their food or beverage orders, so long as those individuals are at least six feet apart from one another while on premises.
 
This section does not prohibit an employee, contractor, vendor, or supplier of a place of public accommodation from entering, exiting, using, or occupying that place of public accommodation in their professional capacity.
 
  1. The restrictions imposed by this order do not apply to any of the following:
 
  1. Places of public accommodation that offer food and beverage not for on-premises consumption, including grocery stores, markets, convenience stores, pharmacies, drug stores, and food pantries, other than those portions of the place of public accommodation subject to the requirements of section 1;
 
  1. Health care facilities, residential care facilities, congregate care facilities, and juvenile justice facilities;
 
  1. Crisis shelters or similar institutions; and
     
  2. Food courts inside the secured zones of airports.
 
  1. For purposes of this order:
 
  1. “Non-essential personal care services” includes but is not limited to hair, nail, tanning, massage, traditional spa, tattoo, body art, and piercing services, and similar personal care services that require individuals to be within six feet of each other. This does not include services necessary for medical treatment as determined by a licensed medical provider.
 
  1. “Place of public accommodation” means a business, or an educational, refreshment, entertainment, or recreation facility, or an institution of any kind, whether licensed or not, whose goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, or accommodations are extended, offered, sold, or otherwise made available to the public. Place of public accommodation also includes the facilities of private clubs, including country clubs, golf clubs, boating or yachting clubs, sports or athletic clubs, and dining clubs.
 
  1. “Place of public amusement” means a place of public accommodation that offers indoor services or facilities, or outdoor services or facilities involving close contact of persons, for amusement or other recreational or entertainment purposes. A place of public amusement includes an amusement park, arcade, bingo hall, bowling alley, indoor climbing facility, skating rink, trampoline park, and other similar recreational or entertainment facilities.
 
  1. The director of the Department of Health and Human Services, the Michigan Liquor Control Commission, and the executive director of the Michigan Gaming Control Board must issue orders and directives and take other actions pursuant to law as necessary to implement this order.
 
  1. This order does not alter any of the obligations under law of an employer affected by this order to its employees or to the employees of another employer.
 
  1. Consistent with MCL 10.33 and MCL 30.405(3), a willful violation of this order is a misdemeanor.
 
  1. On March 22, 2020 at 9:00 am, Executive Order 2020-9 is rescinded.
 

Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State of Michigan.